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As we are constantly being reminded from every angle, to be healthy you need to eat the right foods and exercise. That’s all good and well for able-bodied people who can go for a run or do an aerobic exercise routine, but what about those who are unable?

As we are constantly being reminded from every angle, to be healthy you need to eat the right foods and exercise. That’s all good and well for able-bodied people who can go for a run or do an aerobic exercise routine, but what about those who are unable to due to being in a wheelchair you may ask? Well, the good news is, that it is rather simple to exercise without moving your legs if you know how.

Exercising for those with other mobility restrictions such as a leg or foot injury or a disorder that limits your ability to move is just as important. If you do have an injury, the main thing to remember is to not put that injured part of your body under any undue stress, to prevent further damage. Your medical practitioner will be able to advise you on what would be best for you with your personal circumstances.

One of the biggest challenges to initiating an exercise routine for most people is motivation and fear.

These mental barriers can seriously deter many from undertaking any strenuous exercise, regardless of whether they have mobility or not. If you are worried about exercising in a gym with other people around, do your exercise at home. For those who think it is going to be too difficult to exercise, start out slowly, doing a little bit at a time, then slowly increase the amount of time you spend exercising. This should help overcome that "blockage" you may have towards exercise.

Working Out In A Wheelchair

The main types of exercise that are recommended for people in a wheelchair are those that include cardiovascular and flexibility routines. These not only improve your overall fitness, they also help to relieve or prevent decubitus ulcers from forming, which is a common problem among those that have to sit all the time. These exercises also aid your posture and can help to relieve pain in the back.

It is possible to do "chair aerobics", which is a series of repetitive movements that can be done from a chair. Aerobics increases your heart rate and helps you burn off all those excess calories. Any form of exercise that is repetitive is useful, and repetition is a common factor of any strength training. By doing things repetitively, you can loosen up your joints quite well.

Although running, jogging and walking may be out of the question, many people with mobility issues find it easier to exercise in the water. This is because the water has the ability to support their body, and the risk of injury to joints and muscles is greatly reduced. Strength training largely focuses on the upper body for those that are wheelchair bound, but this too can improve your overall fitness.

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