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Patients with erectile dysfunction and low testosterone levels are usually treated with Viagra. However, more and more physicians are found prescribing both Viagra and testosterone to such patients. Study shows that this may not provide any added benefit.

Viagra is a well-established name in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. There have been many studies conducted in the past which have found that sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, benefits the patients suffering from erectile dysfunction. But it has also been noted that around one-quarter to one-third of patients who have erectile dysfunction, also have a low level of testosterone.

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Based on this finding, more and more physicians have started prescribing testosterone in addition to Viagra, for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. However, until now, no study was conducted to see whether giving testosterone in conjunction with sildenafil, provided any added benefit to the patients of erectile dysfunction.

A new study, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, was carried out to determine whether addition of testosterone to Viagra therapy improved the erectile response in men suffering from erectile dysfunction.

The present study was led by Dr. Matthew Spitzer from the Boston University School of Medicine. He, along with his colleagues, recruited 140 men suffering from erectile dysfunction and low testosterone levels, for their study. All the men were between the ages of 40 and 70. They were prescribed Viagra in the dose of 50 to 100 milligrams for three to seven weeks and they were asked to rate their erectile response on the erectile function domain (EFD) of the International Index of Erectile Function.

A normal man, with no erectile dysfunction scores 30 on the EFD. An EFD score of 17 to 21denotes mild to moderate erectile dysfunction, whereas a score of 11 to 16 is considered moderate dysfunction. Administration of Viagra alone was accompanied with a significant improvement in the EFD score. On an average the score improved from 12.1 to 19.8.

After giving Viagra alone for a few weeks, the participants were randomly divided into two groups. While the first group was given 10-gof testosterone daily through a transdermal gel for a period of 14 weeks, the second group received a placebo. After the study period, the EFD scores of the two groups were compared. It was seen that the EFD score did not show any significant change in either of the groups. The findings remained the same irrespective of whether the participants were obese, men with lower levels of testosterone at the start of the study, or they showed an inadequate response to Viagra.

Based on the results of the study, the researchers concluded that there is no added benefit of prescribing testosterone to patients who are already on Viagra for erectile dysfunction.

The only drawback of the study was that researchers did not study the effect of testosterone alone in patients of erectile dysfunction.

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