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After about 8 weeks of working out... I'm really starting to get into my weight training and I'm liking the results I'm seeing. :)

Two questions for your veterans:

1. How many calories do you burn during a normal 60-minute workout? (I know it's varies and it's not anywhere near the effectiveness of burning calories when running.) But I'm try to see how 60 minutes of weights compares with say a 45 - 60 minute run. I don't break a sweat during my workouts, but I know my heart is pumping somewhate. I'm trying to minimize down time between sets as well. Just trying to estimate the cardio impact of what has become my normal 60 - 75 minute workout so I can figure out what my caloric intake should be on normal days and workout days.

2. When weight training - Do you attempt to totally fatigue the muscle group in question? Or do you aim to do more reps (and finish 3 complete sets) at say a slightly lower weight? What is the benefit of "fatiguing" the muscle totally? I try to do 3 sets of 12 for everything.

Thanks in advance.

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After about 8 weeks of working out... I'm really starting to get into my weight training and I'm liking the results I'm seeing. :) Two questions for your veterans: 1. How many calories do you burn during a normal 60-minute workout? (I know it's varies and it's not anywhere near the effectiveness of burning calories when running.) But I'm try to see how 60 minutes of weights compares with say a 45 - 60 minute run. I don't break a sweat during my workouts, but I know my heart is pumping somewhate. I'm trying to minimize down time between sets as well. Just trying to estimate the cardio impact of what has become my normal 60 - 75 minute workout so I can figure out what my caloric intake should be on normal days and workout days. 2. When weight training - Do you attempt to totally fatigue the muscle group in question? Or do you aim to do more reps (and finish 3 complete sets) at say a slightly lower weight? What is the benefit of "fatiguing" the muscle totally? I try to do 3 sets of 12 for everything. Thanks in advance.
I have no idea on question 1 but question 2 depends on what you are trying to achieve with your weight training. Lower weight - higher reps generally is associated with toning, endurance and muscle definition. Higher weight - fewer reps for building muscle mass. Therefore, if you're looking to get stronger, bigger muscles then bring the weight up and lower the reps. My own upper body lifting program has me using heavy weights and low reps on Mon and Fri and lighter weights with high reps on Wed. Tues/Thurs are reserved for abs and sometimes shoulders if I have time. On Mon/Fri. I usually do 3 sets of 6 (or as many as i can get on the last set) and pyramid the weights up with each ensuing set. For example, on bench press I'll 1st set of 6 with 175 lbs, 2nd set of 6 with 185 lbs and 3rd set with 195 lbs and do as many as I can safely do. I'm not very interested in building more bulk, just trying to keep what I've got and it's been working quite well.
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1. How many calories do you burn during a normal 60-minute workout?
According to the handy dandy runningforums calculators, about 300.

2. When weight training - Do you attempt to totally fatigue the muscle group in question?
Do you mean go to failure on the last set? If so, no. That's too much stress. Maybe if strength training were my main focus, but maybe not even then. I've read some theories about that not being good for you.

I try to get a good burn going for each set and I usually stick in the 3 set of 10-12 range. The only thing I'm not doing that way right now is flat barbell bench. I'm doing 5 sets of 5 for that.
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Since Rob answered the second question, I'll answer the first. According to The Compendium of Physical Activities Tracking Guide, "weight lifting (free weight, nautilus or universal-type), power lifting or body building, vigorous effort" has a MET level of 6.0. A good way to estimate the number of kcals burned is with the following formula: (METs * 3.5 * body weight in kg)/200 = kcal/min An example: A 150 pound individual = 68.2 kg (6*3.5*68.2)/200 = 7.2 kcals burned per minute Which translates into about 430 for that 60 minutes of your weight workout.
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1. How many calories do you burn during a normal 60-minute workout?
According to the handy dandy calculators, about 300.

According to your calculator, I burn 360 kcals for a 60 minute vigorous weight training workout.

According to my calculations in the above post, I burn 378 kcals for that 60 minutes.

You weigh more than me, how come you're only getting 300?
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You weigh more than me, how come you're only getting 300?
Because I went for an average between vigorous (477 kcals) and light (239 kcals). I almost never superset any more.
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Wow... Weight training burns more calories then I thought! I'm a little surprised at that.

5 mile run at ~125 calories/mile = 625 calories burned in about 45 minutes. 300 - 400 calories from a 60 minute workout is closer then I thought.
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