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Okay so to introduce myself I am a 24 yr old British guy who elected to have a Tonsilectomy on the advice of an ENT specialist. I am currently on a working holiday in Australia, so although I do have the help of my flat mates, they work everyday so I am pretty much on my own with this one thousands of miles from home! But as an adult there is no need for a nurse or any rubbish like that, you can make it to the toilet, kitchen etc. The reasons I elected for this surgery is occasional bouts of tonsillitis since I was 18 (recently had my first time off work with this - a major problem when not on a permanent contract) and also chronically inflamed and infected tonsils. Horrible white smelly tonsilliths and puss constantly oozing out of them. This always gave me a bad taste in my throat even five mins after brushing and made me conscious of having bad breath so I was always chewing gum. My advice, as an adult if you have given some thought to having your tonsils removed, then like me you obviously have a problem that is seriously depressing/annoying you enough that you want to solve it; you won't regret getting your tonsils removed. Simply put no more tonsils means no more tonsil problems. Be prepared though - for a dew days it is going to hurt, serious, serious pain, which only medical intervention will alleviate. From what I have learned tonsils will not repair themselves as you get older and are likely to become more cryptic and give you regular problems. As with your appendix etc you won't miss them when they're gone. I have heard of people having their tonsils lasered instead, which smoothens the tonsil crypts reducing tonsil stones an subsequent infections. This does sound like a less painful option, but for me I decided just to get rid of them completely to avoid any future problems. I had read a fair few online accounts and blogs on adult tonsilectomy prior to making my decision. I understand everyone is different, reacts differently to surgery, pain, meds etc and can just be plain unlucky. I have always had a good pain threshold when it comes to injuries and surgery so I think I am lucky in this respect. But really I believe that pain can be controlled with the right drugs and a good attitude towards it. The body in general is incredibly resilient, let's never forget that. This is particularly true when you're youngish - when most people have tonsils removed. Going into the surgery just try to focus on any medical problems or injuries/accidents you have had in your past and how your body probably came through with flying colours. The pain gets worse throughout the first week and then peaks. It is particularly bad overnight when you sleep as the meds wear off and you don't drink as much. Always take the pain killers on time, you will still have severe pain but hopefully only for brief periods. My only other advise would be to try and eat and drink as normal as possible (if not eat more to aid recovery). It isn't comfortable and feels like more of a chore than pleasure early on, but it is essential. Drink plain old water until your pee is clear (excuse the crudeness)! Also get stocked up with plenty of books, movies, non physical work/ revision/study etc. Here is my day by day account of my experience from surgery to recovery. Day 1. Surgery was very good - vaguely remember waking up after it but then fell back to sleep for thirty mins in recovery area. Then transferred to sit and watch tv/relax. Zero pain, ate sandwiches, ice cream, jelly, custard straight away and drank lemonade and water. Pain meds were flawlessly good. Continued to feel good, got changed into street clothes at 6.30pm (op finished at 3pm). the tonsil holes are huge - actually very surprising! Doc checked the wound twice over the next few hours and said he was happy with progress so I could go home. Another shot of fluids and antibiotics through intravenous drip, some painkillers and then the 40 mins drive home. Felt tired when I got in. Tried to have soup - bad move the warmth was painful. So had a protein shake, banana and then drank water and ate ice cream until bed a few hours later. Slept initially - throat was so dry though had trouble breathing through nose only so kept waking up and things just got drier throughout the night. Slept with water next to me and kept on sipping throughout the night. So not much sleep first night unfortunately. Still no early start to physically labour at work the next day so I was happy! Day 2. I should say PAIN was no problem throughout the first night. The dryness is uncomfortable and keeps you awake, yes, but the pain is like having a raw throat. Having tonsillitis is worse in my experience. I didn't feel the need to take codeine in the AM but remembered what doc said about taking pain control irrespective of how I felt so did this along with antibiotics after breakfast. I had some wettabix, banana, protein shake and also some scrambled egg to eat and OJ to drink. Trying to keep my weight up during recovery as I'm skinny enough as it is and have high metabolism! It's funny sudden laughter and nose breathing was difficult at this stage - like I had forgotten how to do it. Maybe it is the new shape of my palate, i don't know. Ate very well throughout the day, ranging from toast to chicken nuggets. Walked to the post office to pick up a belated birthday present and had no problems. Went to bed after watching tv all evening and slept fairly well. Still woke up a few times to go to toilet/drink. The only downside of day two was showering. I stupidly had a fairly hot shower - as soon as the water hit my neck it triggered bleeding in my throat. Try not to panic if this happens, just reduce the temp and then rinse your mouth. Fortunately my bleeding stopped within a minute. I think the high temp must have affected my blood pressure causing the bleed. Day 3. Woke up at around 8 and had a warm shower with no problems this time. Breakfast was cereals, eggs and protein shake with fruit. Luckily I live about 50m away from an amazing beach so spent all morning sunbathing and reading at the beach. I think getting outside when recovering is a good idea (if the weather permits it) as the fresh air feels great and you don't end up looking ill and like you haven't seen sunlight in weeks! Day 4. Again the pain was minimal at this point, eating and drinking was not a problem. I even felt well enough to talk (although it is difficult) and head into town to the supermarket. However the night was the worst yet with pain creeping in an ear ache starting. Day 5. Woke up in a fair bit of pain but took my codeine To help reduce it. After about an hour or so it calmed down and I got on with the day. Still ate very well although protein shakes an some drinks started to sting after consumption. Drunk lots of water after to clean it off. Went to bed at around 10pm, this is when the fun started. This was the first night that I couldn't sleep as the pain was throbbing and earache was bad. Took some Tramadol to help but it didn't do much. Day 6. Slept on and off between 12-6am. But by morning the pain was excruciating. The only way to cope with it was to drink water (swallowing was very painful - felt like water going directly onto an exposed nerve or something!) and phone someone to take my mind off it. Got out of bed at 10 and took another tramadol. Showered and forced down breakfast of toast and peanut butter and a protein shake. This was a slow and painful experience, with lots of water sips needed to get the food down. Spent the rest of the morning in the garden reading and psyching myself up for the battle that would be eating lunch. The pain improved throughout the day (I started taking a fair amount of ibuprofen on top of the tramadol) but eating was still painful. Had a good look down my throat and it actually looked a lot better; there was a lot of white scabby material coating the wound but swelling of my uluva and throat had reduced. On a side note don't be worried if on day 2-5 the uluva is huge - mine was basically touching my tongue at one point. It will reduce in time. Completely OD'd on painkillers in the evening and ate/drank as much as I could before bed. Slept for a good few hours and then again in the early hours of the morning (I woke up around 2am in pain so took more meds and drank water). Day 7. Pain was okay during the day and talking was becoming a little easier. Took a cycle trip to the chemist to buy some more ibuprofen - I had been eating them like sweeties! I did feel very 'blocked up' around my ears and had some pain in gums at the back of my mouth. I figured this was probably just some pain transference around the tonsil area. I will say that eating had become very difficult at this point. It was like every time food passed down my throat that it was scrapping a raw blister or similar. Very sharp, intense pain but as soon as I cleansed it with a sip of water it would stop. I persisted to eat (albeit slowly) as I wanted to keep things as normal as possible and I was remembering what my doc had said about recovery. Day 8. Sleeping was petty good overnight and I woke up with a pretty raw throat but nothing like the pain of the previous few days. Ate a large breakfast which was super painful and took me about 20 mins. Had my last dose of antibiotic pills and some more pain meds. Cycled to the post office to get some fresh air, this was the highlight of my day! Pain was bearable for the rest of the day. Talking became easier. When I ate, once side of my throat hurt whilst the other didn't. I think this may be to do with scab differences on either side - however I can't see that far back so don't know! On the plus side it meant I could swallow on my left side with less pain! Certain things (protein shake and citrus drinks still sting and need to be washed down with water). Day 9. Slept uninterrupted from 11 to 6am, which was great. Woke up in pain though and very dry. After a drink, painkiller and 30 mins it calmed down and I got up and ate breakfast. This was easier than day 8! Day 10-13. Pain had reduced almost completely (apart from first thing in the AM, a glass of water and 10 mins or so and it was gone). Eating became a lot easier and by day 13 was almost back to normal. I did have a very swollen tongue still however, not painful or a problem but just swollen at the back. Managed to go for a bit of a night out on day 12 and had a few beers with no problems. Talking is almost back to normal also. Still some white areas visible but looked a lot healthier by this point at the tonsil site. Day 14. Went back to work today. Day 15-18. Wound continued to improve, and selling of tongue reduced. Also noticed feeling of congestion in ENT reduce. Little pain when waking up now and dryness overnight has reduced greatly.

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6 weeks later: Everything is back to normal. BUT my palate has definitely dropped a little and tongue is swollen up a little. After research it appears this can take as long a 6 months to really settle so I will just wait. All in all very happy with the results of this op and my decision. I swallow now and it tastes of nothing - great!!! I brush my teeth in the morning and my breath feels much cleaner throughout the day. If anyone has any questions about any of the above then please just get in touch!
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Hi, I'm just over 3 weeks into recovery from my tonsillectomy and I can honestly say it feels as though things are getting worse. The first 2 weeks were to be as expected, pretty rough, but last week (the 3rd week) I thought I'd got off lightly. Now into my 4th week this week and my voice is definitely different. Pronouncing some words is actually quite tough. If I yawn, the strain on the muscle at the back of my throat and even under my tongue is really painful. I still have a pain inside my right inner ear and ironically, swallowing feels as though I have tonsillitis again! When is this going to end!!
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