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What makes moth balls so addictive? What makes you crave the smell of them? Is there any way to get help wit The problem? Is it a drug addiction that needs rehab? How harmful is smelling moth balls?

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I'm a 24 year old mother of 2 and I have this addiction...It began when I was pregnant with my youngest daughter (who is now 2 years old). I liked the smell of mothballs, and then I noticed that I also likes the smell of toilet bowl deodorizer which I've learned that they both contain Paradichlorobenzene (PDB). I started off just sniffing them, then I've began chewing them up but not eating them. It's like I can't go into the grocery store without buying them. My mom noticed how much I buy them, and she has suspicions of me using them....I don't know how to stop my addiction....
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i have an addiction to smelling mothballs. I do not chew them tho i buy them from the store and have found the easiest way to snif them is to them then in a sock and snif from the bottom. I have sniffed mothballs for almost 8 years now. I am 20 now. I went a couples months without them and found myself coming right back to them. I need to get over this before i lose my brain. I buy them 1 every 2 weeks and am surprised no one has caught on. I will hopefully end this bad habbit soon before its too late.
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NAPHTHALENE is an active ingredient in moth balls, they can be harmful.
If moth balls are inhaled over a long period of time, kidney and liver damage could result. Skin damage/dermatitis, cataracts and retinal damage as well. Inhaling NAPHTHALENE could also damage the central nervous system displaying headaches, confusion, nausea, fatigue, vomitting and sweating.
Eating them is worse.
You obviously have an addiction, and tho your not getting "high" if you will, you still have the compulsion to "sniff" as if you were doing a drug and feel a strong need for your moth balls, giving you your own "personnal high"
You may want to check with a counselor, you may only need a few visits.
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are you taking the piss addicted to mothballs brilliant best thing ive heard in ages
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I started sniffing moth ball after i had my son. It all started when my mom had to put them in her house, after tha it has drivin me crazy for the past 2 months. I even have to carry them around with me in my purse. I wont to stop this before it makes me sick!!! How do i get help???
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I tend to sniff mothballs often.  due to which i developed anaemic state as naphthalene tend to reduce red blood cells .

however could not stop it then.. any suggestions

 

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It is hard to stop sniffing the naptha- mothballs. I've been doing it since I was a teen & I'm 34. I may start, then go months or years w/o doing it, but I always start up again. I even had started scraping the dust off & snorting it, which I know is bad. I went to the doctor & was diagnosed with anemia. So I threw all my mothballs away & started taking my iron meds. I still crave them everyday, but I want to live.
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mothballs are a real nuisance!
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I actually thought I was alone in this. I've been sniffing mothballs since I was 8 off and on. I am now 30. I have developed anemia, and have passed out in the past behind the wheel of my car resulting in a head on collision fracturing my pelvis. I have not been able to confirm if its relative to the mothballs. At about the age of 20-21, the sniffing turned into chewing, though I do not swallow them. I have noticed that I develop gruesome headaches after continuous use. It has been hidden, though some of my friends noticed the box in one of my bathrooms and asked why I had them. I convinced them they were bought to keep clothes moths away, though there are none scattered in any of my closets. I've started seeing a therapist as a first step, and it has slowed down the want for them, though I am not completely "cured". They are extremely dangerous, and just like any other addiction is easier said than done to just quit. Seek help. There are therapists than refer you you to clinics and facilities to help. Most states have programs to assist those who cannot medically afford the more intensive and expensive treatment options. 

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My story is similar, i started when i was 13? i think when i found these stupid things in my neighbors back yard, loved the smell of it then became seriously addicted to them.....i finally stopped around 25 or 26 i don't remember but i developed a serious anemia, years went by and three blood transfusions later i'm still paying for this stupid addiction....my body is totally screwed cause of it, i don't know how to fix it now....

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Assessing Personal Exposure
Naphthalene or its breakdown products can be measured in fat, urine, and feces. These tests cannot be used to find out how much exposure occurred and require special equipment not routinely available in a doctor's office. (1)
Health Hazard Information
Acute Effects:
Acute exposure of humans to naphthalene by inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact is associated with hemolytic anemia, damage to the liver, and, in infants, neurological damage. Symptoms of acute exposure include headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, malaise, confusion, anemia, jaundice, convulsions, and coma. (1,2,6,7)
Cataracts have been reported in humans acutely exposed to naphthalene by inhalation and ingestion. Cataracts have also been reported in animals following acute oral exposure. (6,7,9)
Tests involving acute exposure of rats, mice, rabbits, and guinea pigs have demonstrated naphthalene to have moderate to high acute toxicity from ingestion and low to moderate acute toxicity from dermal exposure. (3)
Chronic Effects (Noncancer):
Chronic exposure of workers to naphthalene has been reported to cause cataracts and retinal hemorrhage. (2,4,5,6,7)
Chronic inflammation of the lung, chronic nasal inflammation, hyperplasia of the respiratory epithelium in the nose, and metaplasia of the olfactory epithelium were reported in mice chronically exposed to naphthalene via inhalation. (1,6,7)
Rats, rabbits, and mice chronically exposed to naphthalene via ingestion have developed cataracts and degeneration of the retina. (2,5,6,7)
Diarrhea, lethargy, hunched posture, rough coats, decreased body weight, and lesions in the kidneys and thymus were observed in rats and mice chronically exposed via gavage (experimentally placing the chemical in the stomach). (2,6,7)
EPA has calculated a Reference Concentration (RfC) of 0.003 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) for naphthalene based on nasal effects in mice. The RfC is an estimate (with uncertainty spanning perhaps an order of magnitude) of a continuous inhalation exposure to the human population (including sensitive subgroups) that is likely to be without appreciable risk of deleterious noncancer effects during a lifetime. It is not a direct estimator of risk but rather a reference point to gauge the potential effects. At exposures increasingly greater than the RfC, the potential for adverse health effects increases. Lifetime exposure above the RfC does not imply that an adverse health effect would necessarily occur. (6,7)
EPA has medium confidence in the RfC based on: 1) medium confidence in the principal study because adequate numbers of animals were used, severity of nasal effects increased at higher exposure concentrations, high mortality, and hematological evaluation not conducted beyond 14 days; and 2) low to medium confidence in the database because there are no chronic or subchronic inhalation studies in other animal species and there are no reproductive or developmental inhalation studies. (6,7)
The Reference Dose (RfD) for naphthalene is 0.02 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day (mg/kg/d) based on decreased body weight in male rats. (6,7)
EPA has low confidence in the RfD based on: 1) high confidence in the principal study because adequate numbers of animals were included and experimental protocols were adequately designed, conducted, and reported; and 2) low confidence in the database because of the lack of adequate chronic oral data, dose-response data for hemolytic anemia, and two-generation reproductive toxicological studies. (6,7)
Reproductive/Developmental Effects:
Hemolytic anemia has been reported in infants born to mothers who "sniffed" and ingested naphthalene (as mothballs) during pregnancy. The mothers themselves were anemic, but to a lesser extent than the infants. (5,6,7)
Signs of maternal toxicity (e.g., decreased body weight and lethargy) but no fetal effects were reported in rats and rabbits exposed to naphthalene via gavage. (6,7)
Maternal toxicity (increased mortality and reduced weight gain) and fetotoxicity (reduced number of live pups per litter) were observed in mice exposed via gavage. (2,6,7)
Cancer Risk:
Workers occupationally exposed to vapors of naphthalene and coal tar developed laryngeal carcinomas or neoplasms of the pylorus and cecum. However, this study is inadequate because there were no controls, exposure levels were not determined, and subjects were exposed to complex mixtures containing other demonstrated carcinogens. (2,5,6,7)
Di-, tri-, and tetramethyl naphthalene contaminants of coal tar were found to be carcinogenic when applied to the skin of mice, but naphthalene alone was not. (2,5)
An increased number of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas were reported in female mice exposed by inhalation. (1,6,7)
No carcinogenic responses were reported in rats exposed to naphthalene in their diet and by injection. (2,5,6)
EPA has classified naphthalene as a Group C, possible human carcinogen. (6,7)
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Mothballs are really a toxic substance

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I sniff lavender scented moth cakes. I buy them , crumble and sprinkle around the house. My place smells great to me. I tried to stop but I can't. I am educated and well established. I need help. Going cold turkey for two days now. Sounds stupid but this is serious
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Jesus SNORTING them really?? Dang I cringed when I read this. Ha I'm not surprised u got anemia, but I am surprised as to why you are not extremely sick, still able to write, or dead. Sorry. Moth balls are extremely bad for you. Period.
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