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After reading about copper peptides and their amazing anti-oxidant and anti-aging properties, I began seeking out products that contain copper peptides. I won't list the products I actually used because it does not matter much, but I use eye cream and a serum, both supposed to be among the very best copper peptides products on the market. I was expecting cell repair and line reduction. I was expecting to look better than ever before, and was told that clinical studies supported the claims made my manufacturers whose products contain copper peptides. 

After using these products for a while, however, I did start seeing changes. They were not the changes I was expecting and hoping for though: they were the exact opposite. My skin became more sensitive and apparently thinner, and I started seeing more wrinkles, not less. My skin looks like a fragile sheet of rice paper now. At first, I was not sure whether copper peptides were really responsible for these changes or if they were unrelated, but when I started Googling this, it turned out that, contrary to the claim that copper peptides have no side effects at all, many people actually have similar issues. 

I am sharing this in the hope that people who are looking for the ultimate anti-age solution in copper peptides will think twice and will do their research before going ahead. 

I quit using copper peptides and live in hope that my skin will recover.

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User avatar
Health Advisor
545 posts

Hiya,

Whoah. I have to say that sounds pretty severe and scary. Thanks for sharing I guess, but I do wonder... I've heard about copper peptides before and have even heard people comment that too much of them isn't good at all, but I'm not sure what products they're in, nor for whom their good and who can really end up with damage. What would copper peptides be listed as on ingredient lists? Just like that, or under other names too? I would definitely like to avoid them but who knows? Could be I'm already using cosmetics that contain copper peptides without knowing it?

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User avatar
Celebrity
439 posts

I will immediately admit that, although I am familiar with the term copper peptides, I really don't know much about them or about how they are supposed to work on a chemical level. Reading on the web as I often do though, I did come across bits and pieces where people advised to build the use of copper peptides up slowly, so to start with a very small amount and then to increase slowly. I have also read that copper peptides interact with vitamin C serum in a bad way. Do you know anything about that, perhaps? And do you now think copper peptides are always bad, or that they should just be used carefully?

Rosie

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User avatar
Celebrity
413 posts

Copper peptides can be great for the skin. They are best for people with uneven skin tones and discoloration. They can reduce scarring and promote healing as well, and many people use them for their anti-aging properties. Having said that, copper peptides are simply not for everyone. If you have active and fairly bad acne, then copper peptides are not for you. They are not good for people with oily skin types either, because they can make oily skin even oilier. Those people who have sensitive skin types or skin conditions should only use them after consulting a dermatologist, or, if you weren't diagnosed with anything, you can try a little bit out on a small (small!) portion of your face. If the "spot test" doesn't show allergic or otherwise undesirable effects, they will probably be fine for you.

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It is interesting you mention that.
This story is not the first time I have heard bad reviews of copper peptides. Some swear by them, others swear at them, LOL. I am currently struggling with sun damage and wrinkles and would love a product that could rejuvenate my face. Because copper peptides do get a bad press, I was not really considering using them. Why risk it, you know? Your post makes me think again though because your description makes it sound like they are essentially perfect for my skin. What product would you recommend, so I can look it up more?
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Copper peptides have some well-documented risks or side effects. Among the side effects of copper peptides are:

- Redness and irritation of the skin. This is particularly true if users apply more than recommended. Following the recommendations of the manufacturer is key here.
- Copper in too large an amount can result in digestive problems, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, because your liver cannot cope with filtering too much copper out.
- Facial sagging and excessive wrinkles.

Using copper peptides in large amounts means you are placing yourself at risk of seeing an effect that is the opposite of what you signed up for. Not many mainstream over the counter skincare brands use them as far as I know, and you have to seek out copper peptides actively to get them. Those who use them in small amounts may not see any harsh effects but if you use too much, watch out. Many people have tossed their copper peptide products after noticing increased wrinkling and sagging as well as irritation.
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I used copper peptides a few years ago too. I don't really want to go into the whole story except to say that my skin has lost collagen and elastin and I was left with hollow looking skin and huge bags under my eyes. In thinking that I was doing something good for my skin, I actually committed one of the worst mistakes I ever made. It has really affected my self esteem and I am now considering surgical intervention to try to fix some of the damage that was done. Yes, copper peptides are dangerous. I wish they would be banned, but failing that I can at least warn people not to do what I did! I am sorry that you too fell into the trap, OP.
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User avatar
Celebrity
413 posts
Well, in your situation, I would start by looking into Retin-A. Though it does make your skin more sensitive to the sun, meaning you have to use an excellent sunscreen to make it work, Retin-A also reduces damage caused by the sun, as well as reducing wrinkles in general. Retin-A is also excellent for people with acne. In addition, if you have sun damage, you could consider having a TCA peel or an obagi peel done to reduce the effects. You will look better very quickly, but you do need to find the right person for the job.
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