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Hi, a few years ago I was using OxyContin for severe pain, and it helped me more than any other drug. A few weeks ago, my pain started to torture me again, so I went to a doctor. I asked him to prescribe me OxyContin again, but he wouldn’t. He seamed like he doesn’t trust me that I’m in pain, and he thinks that I’m acting the symptoms because I’m abuser. I don’t want his opinion to cost me many sleepless nights, and I want to buy OxyContin on the streets. Does anyone know the price?

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Hello, many people are addicted to OxyContin, so you shouldn’t be surprised that the doctors are suspicious. Very often “patients” come to them asking for this drug and pretend to have the symptoms of severe pain. The street prices of OxyContin are huge, and they range from $5 to $10 for a 10 mg pill, from $10 to $20 for a 20 mg pill, from $25 to $40 for a 40 mg pill and a 80 mg pill cost unbelievable $65 to $80. This street price of OxyContin only shows how much people abuse this narcotic pain reliever. In producing opiate-like effects, it is similar to codeine, methadone, and morphine. In pharmacies, it is sold for oral usage, but abusers take it by chewing the tablets, crushing them and snorting the powder and by intravenous injections. There are some mild side effects, like nausea, drowsiness and constipation, but an acute overdose can cause skeletal muscle flaccidity, constricted pupils, respiratory depression, coma and even death!! So, be very careful if you start using this drug again.
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blancett -- I am truly sorry that you are having such difficulty obtaining OxyContin, particularly if you know from personal experience as a patient that this painkiller is useful to you and has helped you in the past.

Your plight symbolizes a terrible sadness in the US. Bluntly stated, it is well known that doctors in the US are notorious for undertreating chronic pain, and for not prescribing adequate pain relief, particularly to those patients who suffer from an underlying, serious medical disorder that is the source of severe and unremitting pain. I suffer from a very painful, degenerative connective tissue disorder named Marfan syndrome. In my case, expression of this syndrome is severe -- my back is a mess, with annular bulges, spur formation, prominent Schmorl's nodes, levoscoliosis, facet joint arthropathy, disc compression and loss of discal height, bone marrow signal changes, extensive osteophyte formation, and other degenerative symptoms too many to mention on this thread. I lived and worked in New York City from 1986 through 2004. This syndrome first became really troublesome to me in 1995, when my primary care physician scheduled me for an MRI and determined that, in addition to the back problems, I have an ascending aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm is now being addressed with beta blockers and with an entirely new line of therapy involving angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs), which have been shown to suppress the overactivity of a hormone named Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta). Overactivity of TGF-beta causes many of the problems in Marfan patients that cannot be explained exclusively in terms of the genetic defect that causes the formation of insufficiently elastic connective tissue (in Marfan patients, a gene named FBN1 on the 15th chromosome pair codes for a defective version of a protein named fibrillin-1; this causes some, but not all, of the problems associated with the syndrome). A prominent Marfan specialist in the US – Dr. Harry Dietz – has managed to reverse aortic aneurysms in pediatric Marfan cases, and he is now conducting trials with adults who suffer from aortic aneurysms and other manifestations of Marfan syndrome. At this point, there is a great deal of excitement, because his early results (and his unequivocal results in children) suggest that the administration of ARBs may in fact result in a functional cure for some of the more dangerous manifestations.

Unfortunately, nothing can be done about the damage that has already been done to my spine and joints. My doctor in NYC put me onto OxyContin in 1995, when this drug first became available. I have never regretted this decision. I originally took only 60 mg every 12 hours, whereas I now take 200 mg every 12 hours – however, there is no ceiling to the administration of opiates / opioids in patients who have been treated with these drugs, and an opiate / opioid experienced patient can take doses of morphine, oxycodone, etc. that would kill a treatment-naïve patient. I have never regretted the decision to take high-dose opiates / opioids (opioids are synthetic, whereas opiates are naturally-occurring derivatives of opium). I am once again able to lead a life free from pain, misery, and needless suffering.

When I moved to the UK in 2007, the difference between the attitudes of doctors in the US and that of doctors in the UK was like the difference between night and day. Whereas doctors in the US are terrified of prescribing opiates / opioids to their patients, doctors in the UK do whatever is necessary. My doctor in the UK had no hesitation whatsoever in continuing my prescription (I furnished her with my medical records and a letter from my NYC doctor), and has never hesitated to titrate my dose upwards when needed. Doctors in the UK treat chronic pain sympathetically and without making slanderous assumptions about their patients. Furthermore, my UK doctor trusts me to fill a two-month supply of OxyContin, OxyNorm (known as OxyIR in the US), and the UK equivalent of Tylenol #3 with codeine (marketed as Co-codamol in the UK). In fact, obtaining Co-codamol is so easy it is almost laughable – whereas doctors in the US hem and haw over every prescription for this compound analgesic, my doctor in the UK has issued standing instructions to the practice receptionist to issue refills on my lorazepam, Co-codamol, OxyNorm, and OxyContin prescriptions as and when I need them, no questions asked.

There are also differences with respect to attitudes of clinicians towards the benzodiazepines (BZDs). I am fully aware of the fact that the BZDs are highly addictive psychologically and mildly addictive physiologically, but I have derived great benefit from these drugs. I suffer from disabling and crippling panic attacks which have not really responded to treatment with the SSRIs or with mirtazapine (a tetracyclic antidepressant known for its efficacy and its usefulness). When I explained to my UK doctor that I have been taking alprazolam for most of my adult life (when I was a first-year student in South Africa, the campus doctor prescribed a new BZD named clobazam (Urbanol, Frisium) to help me through these attacks, and I never looked back with regret on my decision to take these medications), her only response was to suggest that I try taking another BZD named lorazepam (I don’t know why, but whereas alprazolam is the BZD of choice in the NYC area, lorazepam is the BZD of choice in the UK). So I have been taking lorazepam for several years now, with no ill effects. I am well aware of the horror stories that surround lorazepam – people have suffered hallucinations, tremors, dysphoria, depersonalization, and other ugly withdrawal symptoms when deprived of lorazepam (or, for that matter, other BZDs such as diazepam, clonazepam, oxazepam, etc.). However, on those occasions when I have been deprived of lorazepam (for example, when visiting my family in South Africa), the worst I have ever suffered has been a few days of discomfort. Lorazepam is highly effective in aborting a panic attack (in my case) before it has a chance to establish itself, and I give eternal thanks to the men and women who first synthesized drugs from this class, notwithstanding the attitudes of so many clinicians, some of whom flatly refuse to prescribe any drug from these class.

My suggestion to you is that you find a pain management specialist as opposed to a general practitioner. Before leaving the US, I took a consulting assignment in Chicago. My NYC doctor was unwilling to continue sending me prescriptions for more than a couple of months, so I did my homework on the Internet and found a pain management specialist. I gave him copies of my medical records, and he did not hesitate to continue my pain management regimen.

There are doctors out there who will help patients who are in genuine need of powerful pain medications. I think that one of the reasons so many US doctors are afraid to prescribe drugs such as OxyContin and MS Contin is due to fear of being audited by the D.E.A. and by state licensing authorities. Sadly, there is a trend in US society to confuse sound medical practice with its abuse, and to inscribe draconian remedies into the law in response to this confusion. Sound medical judgment should not be second-guessed by bureaucrats, uninhibited by wisdom, knowledge, or experience – but all too often, this happens in the US. Furthermore, the US culture is complicit in portraying those men and women who suffer from chronic pain as drug addicts and basket cases. A prominent case in point is the hit TV series “House”, in which the protagonist is sent for rehab because he took the whopping dose of 80 mg hydrocodone every day! “House” has done more to damage the cause of those men and women who suffer from chronic pain than any official decision could ever have done, and it literally turns my stomach to see Vicodin (and similar drugs) portrayed in the one-sided and negative light that is shed on them by this TV series.

(In the interests of full disclosure – after being diagnosed with Marfan syndrome and after being prescribed OxyContin, I was also prescribed hydrocodone with acetaminophen (APAP) for the control of “breakthrough” pain. Hydrocodone is not available here in the UK, which is why I now take OxyNorm and Co-codamol for the treatment of breakthrough pain.)

Another terrible sadness looms ahead. The FDA’s advisory panel has recommended the withdrawal of compound analgesics such as Vicodin and Percocet, ostensibly because addicts are damaging their livers by taking too many of these pills, thereby ingesting too much paracetamol. Since when, in any sane society, is law and public policy with respect to the availability of medication driven by the behaviour of idiots and fools? Since when is the availability of a useful drug curtailed in a sane society because some people choose to abuse this drug? On what planet are we living? The FDA has yet to decide whether or not to adopt the recommendation of its advisory panel, but should it do so, many doctors foresee even more suffering and pain, as those doctors who currently prescribe Schedule III preparations are prohibited from doing so and are instead forced to choose between prescribing Schedule II preparations and perhaps having their prescribing habits scrutinized by ignorant bureaucrats.

I am glad, for my own sake, that I no longer live in the USA.


PHILIP CHANDLER
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I agree you need to see a pan mnagement specialist, and US doctors do notoriously untreat for pain, however, long acting sever pain relievers like oxicotin is not an appropriate treatment for pain that has been absent and only recently recurred.
Pain relief should be sought with less powerful narcotics first. such as darvocet, vicodin and progressing to percocet/percodan.
OXICOTIN is for SEVER CHRONIC LONG TERM PAIN in patients who have been in pain management for an extended time and have become OPIATE TOLERANT. THere are also other options such as nerve block injections, Cortico-steriod injections which are injeted directly into the he spine under guidance of xray and ultrasound. MY back was broken on two seperate occassions on a total of 3 levels. I have 6 .....3 and 1/2 inch long pedical screws and two 12 inch long titanium rods fusing my spine across 5 vertebre. I also have permanent nueropathic nerve damage down my left leg and foot due to spinal cord compression and laceration.
I went through 3 seperate surgeries and the progression of drugs listed above over a period of 5 years of pain management prior to being putt on oxicotin. Originally 3 10 mg pills per day and progressing to 5 20 mg pills a day over a period of another 2 1/2 years. Eventually I was put on 180 mg per day of morphine sulfate.
However after recieving the cortico-steriod spinal injections (these are not 'nerve blocks', which people often think, or 'trigger point injections' but are a medical procedure which must be done under xray and ultrasound guidance and which are limited to 1 serie of 3 injections per 12 months) I recieved about 75% pain relief from my fusion and nerve damage and was ale to taper off my medication so that I now only take 3 15 mg pills per day ( i also recieve 15 extra per month to use as pain or activity level increases)
Thats a net reduction in pain medication used daily of over 75% by a opiate tolerant patient who has been in pain management since 2000 ...9 years.
Anyone who tells me the just dont want to bother with the hassle and would rather 'buy' it on the street gives me the impression tht First, they must not be in that much pain or they would 'bother with it'
Second, Anyone who walks into a doctors office who he has no long standing relationship with, complaining of pain and immediately asks for the MOST POTENT PAINKILLER on the market today, which has a high potential for abuse and was designed for opiate tolererant chronic pain sufferes without out even considering less powerful painkillers or asking the doctor what he thinks the appropriate pain treatment would be, might as well ask him for a few clean needles and directions to the nearest JUNKIE flop house. Third I wont evn go into the myriad number of alternative non narcotic pain relief methods such as acupuncture, TENS stimulation units, and traction all of which i have endured.
Finally it is individual such as your self who either in my estimation are 'trying to score so they can party' or who actually suffer some legitamite pain, but which is not constant by your own admission, is slight to moderate pain, not the SEVER pain the drug was designed to treat. (for example I wasnt able to even stand or sit on a toilet on my own prior to my last surgery. 9 years after my initial injury I am unable to put on my own socks and shoes due to pain and the fact that my spine is now fused solid over 1/3 its length.
From your post if i was a doctor he first thing I would assume was that you are either a partier or a junkie and it is individuals like you who make people who are LEGITAMATE LONG TERM CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT PATIENTS suffering from SEVERE not moderate pain and who probably have developed some level of opiate tolerance from YEARS in PAIN MANAGEMENT suffer needlessly by making doctors reluctant to perscribe this vital medication to people with a legitamate need because of the numbers of scammers and abusers out there. OF whch I am 99.9 percent sure you are one based on the utter transparancy of your post.
who in their right mind would rather pay $1 a milligram (in my case 105-15 mg pills per month for a total of $1575 as opposed to a $10 pescription copay because they dont want the hassle) ? I can take alot of hassle for $1600 bucks.
Shame on you, may you get help if you need it, recieve Gods forgiveness if you ask for it, and may the weight of suffering you needlessly cause others come down upon your head if you continue to act in the same manner
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I live in Wichita Kansas and was taking oxycontin 40mg every 12 hours and percocet 10 for breakthrough pain
I decided to quit cold turkey 5 days ago, It was pure hell I am in severe pain been on it a year and had to quit for it cost me 389.oo a month for oxycontin, I cannot afford it . the recesseion hit an husband laid off
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I too had the same issue with the price of the Oxy's, almost $400. I have recently switched to morphine sulfate TER, and it works the same if not better than the oxy's for me, since i've been on them so long. and MOST importantly, they make them in generic. So where i was paying $400 a month for 60 40mg ocy & 60 of the oxy HCL 5mg cap for breakthru pain. I'm now paying $94 for 60 60mg morphine sulfate TER & 120 of the oxy HCL 5mg cap. hope it helps you with being pain free & not as broke like me =)
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blancett wrote:


Hi, a few years ago I was using OxyContin for severe pain, and it helped me more than any other drug. A few weeks ago, my pain started to torture me again, so I went to a doctor. I asked him to prescribe me OxyContin again, but he wouldn’t. He seamed like he doesn’t trust me that I’m in pain, and he thinks that I’m acting the symptoms because I’m abuser. I don’t want his opinion to cost me many sleepless nights, and I want to buy OxyContin on the streets. Does anyone know the price?



im jeff and my quack-doc has me on 80mg <<<<<<<2-80"s qid (4 times a day)plus "oxy 20 IRs) idiotstsly released!WOW NOW >>now i have to make sure that nobodies r aware of this or sum buddy will crack my place<<
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Guest wrote:

I agree you need to see a pan mnagement specialist, and US doctors do notoriously untreat for pain, however, long acting sever pain relievers like oxicotin is not an appropriate treatment for pain that has been absent and only recently recurred.
Pain relief should be sought with less powerful narcotics first. such as darvocet, vicodin and progressing to percocet/percodan.
OXICOTIN is for SEVER CHRONIC LONG TERM PAIN in patients who have been in pain management for an extended time and have become OPIATE TOLERANT. THere are also other options such as nerve block injections, Cortico-steriod injections which are injeted directly into the he spine under guidance of xray and ultrasound. MY back was broken on two seperate occassions on a total of 3 levels. I have 6 .....3 and 1/2 inch long pedical screws and two 12 inch long titanium rods fusing my spine across 5 vertebre. I also have permanent nueropathic nerve damage down my left leg and foot due to spinal cord compression and laceration.
I went through 3 seperate surgeries and the progression of drugs listed above over a period of 5 years of pain management prior to being putt on oxicotin. Originally 3 10 mg pills per day and progressing to 5 20 mg pills a day over a period of another 2 1/2 years. Eventually I was put on 180 mg per day of morphine sulfate.
However after recieving the cortico-steriod spinal injections (these are not 'nerve blocks', which people often think, or 'trigger point injections' but are a medical procedure which must be done under xray and ultrasound guidance and which are limited to 1 serie of 3 injections per 12 months) I recieved about 75% pain relief from my fusion and nerve damage and was ale to taper off my medication so that I now only take 3 15 mg pills per day ( i also recieve 15 extra per month to use as pain or activity level increases)
Thats a net reduction in pain medication used daily of over 75% by a opiate tolerant patient who has been in pain management since 2000 ...9 years.
Anyone who tells me the just dont want to bother with the hassle and would rather 'buy' it on the street gives me the impression tht First, they must not be in that much pain or they would 'bother with it'
Second, Anyone who walks into a doctors office who he has no long standing relationship with, complaining of pain and immediately asks for the MOST POTENT PAINKILLER on the market today, which has a high potential for abuse and was designed for opiate tolererant chronic pain sufferes without out even considering less powerful painkillers or asking the doctor what he thinks the appropriate pain treatment would be, might as well ask him for a few clean needles and directions to the nearest JUNKIE flop house. Third I wont evn go into the myriad number of alternative non narcotic pain relief methods such as acupuncture, TENS stimulation units, and traction all of which i have endured.
Finally it is individual such as your self who either in my estimation are 'trying to score so they can party' or who actually suffer some legitamite pain, but which is not constant by your own admission, is slight to moderate pain, not the SEVER pain the drug was designed to treat. (for example I wasnt able to even stand or sit on a toilet on my own prior to my last surgery. 9 years after my initial injury I am unable to put on my own socks and shoes due to pain and the fact that my spine is now fused solid over 1/3 its length.
From your post if i was a doctor he first thing I would assume was that you are either a partier or a junkie and it is individuals like you who make people who are LEGITAMATE LONG TERM CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT PATIENTS suffering from SEVERE not moderate pain and who probably have developed some level of opiate tolerance from YEARS in PAIN MANAGEMENT suffer needlessly by making doctors reluctant to perscribe this vital medication to people with a legitamate need because of the numbers of scammers and abusers out there. OF whch I am 99.9 percent sure you are one based on the utter transparancy of your post.
who in their right mind would rather pay $1 a milligram (in my case 105-15 mg pills per month for a total of $1575 as opposed to a $10 pescription copay because they dont want the hassle) ? I can take alot of hassle for $1600 bucks.
Shame on you, may you get help if you need it, recieve Gods forgiveness if you ask for it, and may the weight of suffering you needlessly cause others come down upon your head if you continue to act in the same manner


I agree with most you said - I mean, 99 percent of what you said. Maybe I should rephrase that - I agree with all of it, but I think you need to hear a different opinion. Not all patients pain is the same. My wife is a nurse and sees a lot of patients each day. Some are addicts and abusers and some are legitimate. But no two patients pain is ever the same. My father for instance never took more than advil his whole life. When he had a car accident he ended up trying not to take any opiates - but at the end of the day - He gave in. It drove him to the point of insanity from the pain- and now is on a relatively high dose of opiates and it barely works on him at all. On the other hand, I fell off a plane and hurt my spine in 3 places and really messed up my knee. I immediately asked for and took all pain meds available. I never took more than I needed to be comfortable - but that being said - I am on 4x percocet 10/325 and hydrocodone 10/325 + one oxycontin 40mg for nighttime so I can stay asleep - after months of 20 minutes to 2 hours max sleep a night- and after a week where I slept a total of 3 hours. He is not an addict, and I am not either. I never seek a high - but for us - perhaps because the DNA is the same, those florascope injections (xray guidance) have a referse effect, increasing pain and discomfort- yet we keep trying - and have different doctors each time - When I first got hurt I took 4 hydrocodone 5/500's a day and was "fine" - not well, but comfortable enough to sleep, exist - now I cant even feel relief from a single 10/325 of anything. I tried forcing myself to reduce my meds - and my tolerance was changed for a few hours, the first hydrocodone 10/325 was effective, but 6 hours later - when I took another - it was an un-noticable effect. Physiology is different for each patient. Don't think someone else is a "wuss" (keeping it clean) for taking more than you, just as someone worse off than you might be able to take less than you. I have a long life ahead - and a career as a pilot - so I am very interested in not having a problem - getting fixed up and heading back to work asap - make a fat ass paycheck and buy nice things - i wouldnt take any more than I need to get by. But other than that - yeah, i agree, the guy is a, screw it with niceties - a total prick. Every drug seeking as****e out there makes it that much harder for others to find the relief they need. I am lucky my doctor is willing to help me, but I have been very honest with him since I met him, and until this injury in 2010, i never asked for any drug except thyroid and antibiotics.
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Guest wrote:

I live in Wichita Kansas and was taking oxycontin 40mg every 12 hours and percocet 10 for breakthrough pain
I decided to quit cold turkey 5 days ago, It was pure hell I am in severe pain been on it a year and had to quit for it cost me 389.oo a month for oxycontin, I cannot afford it . the recesseion hit an husband laid off


I have to call you on this. Maybe I am mistaken and appoligize if I am, but I think you did NOT just decide to go cold turkey. I believe that you took more then your prescription allowed you and ran out early forcing you to go cold turkey. For one thing, if you had gone cold turkey on your own accord you would have have some pills left over. This being the case, after the second day you would not have been tough enough to bare the withdrawls and would have taken them again to stop the pain of said withdrawls.

How do I figure this? Because I have been taking oxycodone for over a year and learned the hard way not to use more then you are given and to be stuck waiting for the refill to befilled in 6 days from the time I ran out.

Now oxycodine 5 mg tabs are a whole lot lighter then oxycontin. A WHOLE lot milder.
Upon the second day I went into sneezing fits and then excessive yawning, and then my ears would get plugged and then the third day the diarea starts up and the buzzing in your head begins.
The nights become long and sleepless with the cold and hot sweats and by the 4th day you are walking around like a zomie from lack of sleep. Just when you start feeling better on the fith day and the 6th day arrive A WHOLE NEW WAVE STARTS UP ALL OVER AGAIN WORSE THEN THE FIRST....

Now by noon on the 6th day my prescription came and within 15 minutes of taking my pills all of the withdrawl sympytoms vanished, but I am scared to even think about if those withdrawls would have continued and for how much longer before the normalacy of your body was back.

I have learned that by reducing my intake 5 days prior to running out early you will have much milder withdrawls but you will still get very little sleep. I can't get my doctor to increase the dosage and I have long ago built a tolerance to what he gives me. I complained to him the other day and he flat out told me he was not going to completely make me pain free. WHAT THEFU#*$*&^%() IS THAT. What the hell is this clown. Some sort of sadistic bastard. I should have every right to feel completely pain free as this ducebag does.
I have to deal with the military disability doctors and that is a touchy buisness for sure. He told me that there were plenty of other providers there that might increase my meds but fat chance of that. If I changed then my doctor would just talk to the new doctor and I might end up with even less then I am getting now and I would be bed ridden if that happened or have to go back to drinking on top of what they did give me and I can not take a chance on the drunk scene again. I drankfor thrity years and have been good for 12 years now and I
will freely admit that booze will kill me way quicker then any of these light wieght pain killers will.

But again just to call you on your most liely fabricated cold turcky story. I just find it very hard to swallow that cold turkey was YOUR voluntary choice especially with the oxycontin. I will again apologize if I am wrong. Good luck to all of you with this world of pain we must all endure in one form or another. God be with you!!!
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philipcfromnyc wrote:

blancett -- I am truly sorry that you are having such difficulty obtaining OxyContin, particularly if you know from personal experience as a patient that this painkiller is useful to you and has helped you in the past.

Your plight symbolizes a terrible sadness in the US. Bluntly stated, it is well known that doctors in the US are notorious for undertreating chronic pain, and for not prescribing adequate pain relief, particularly to those patients who suffer from an underlying, serious medical disorder that is the source of severe and unremitting pain. I suffer from a very painful, degenerative connective tissue disorder named Marfan syndrome. In my case, expression of this syndrome is severe -- my back is a mess, with annular bulges, spur formation, prominent Schmorl's nodes, levoscoliosis, facet joint arthropathy, disc compression and loss of discal height, bone marrow signal changes, extensive osteophyte formation, and other degenerative symptoms too many to mention on this thread. I lived and worked in New York City from 1986 through 2004. This syndrome first became really troublesome to me in 1995, when my primary care physician scheduled me for an MRI and determined that, in addition to the back problems, I have an ascending aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm is now being addressed with beta blockers and with an entirely new line of therapy involving angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs), which have been shown to suppress the overactivity of a hormone named Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta). Overactivity of TGF-beta causes many of the problems in Marfan patients that cannot be explained exclusively in terms of the genetic defect that causes the formation of insufficiently elastic connective tissue (in Marfan patients, a gene named FBN1 on the 15th chromosome pair codes for a defective version of a protein named fibrillin-1; this causes some, but not all, of the problems associated with the syndrome). A prominent Marfan specialist in the US – Dr. Harry Dietz – has managed to reverse aortic aneurysms in pediatric Marfan cases, and he is now conducting trials with adults who suffer from aortic aneurysms and other manifestations of Marfan syndrome. At this point, there is a great deal of excitement, because his early results (and his unequivocal results in children) suggest that the administration of ARBs may in fact result in a functional cure for some of the more dangerous manifestations.

Unfortunately, nothing can be done about the damage that has already been done to my spine and joints. My doctor in NYC put me onto OxyContin in 1995, when this drug first became available. I have never regretted this decision. I originally took only 60 mg every 12 hours, whereas I now take 200 mg every 12 hours – however, there is no ceiling to the administration of opiates / opioids in patients who have been treated with these drugs, and an opiate / opioid experienced patient can take doses of morphine, oxycodone, etc. that would kill a treatment-naïve patient. I have never regretted the decision to take high-dose opiates / opioids (opioids are synthetic, whereas opiates are naturally-occurring derivatives of opium). I am once again able to lead a life free from pain, misery, and needless suffering.

When I moved to the UK in 2007, the difference between the attitudes of doctors in the US and that of doctors in the UK was like the difference between night and day. Whereas doctors in the US are terrified of prescribing opiates / opioids to their patients, doctors in the UK do whatever is necessary. My doctor in the UK had no hesitation whatsoever in continuing my prescription (I furnished her with my medical records and a letter from my NYC doctor), and has never hesitated to titrate my dose upwards when needed. Doctors in the UK treat chronic pain sympathetically and without making slanderous assumptions about their patients. Furthermore, my UK doctor trusts me to fill a two-month supply of OxyContin, OxyNorm (known as OxyIR in the US), and the UK equivalent of Tylenol #3 with codeine (marketed as Co-codamol in the UK). In fact, obtaining Co-codamol is so easy it is almost laughable – whereas doctors in the US hem and haw over every prescription for this compound analgesic, my doctor in the UK has issued standing instructions to the practice receptionist to issue refills on my lorazepam, Co-codamol, OxyNorm, and OxyContin prescriptions as and when I need them, no questions asked.

There are also differences with respect to attitudes of clinicians towards the benzodiazepines (BZDs). I am fully aware of the fact that the BZDs are highly addictive psychologically and mildly addictive physiologically, but I have derived great benefit from these drugs. I suffer from disabling and crippling panic attacks which have not really responded to treatment with the SSRIs or with mirtazapine (a tetracyclic antidepressant known for its efficacy and its usefulness). When I explained to my UK doctor that I have been taking alprazolam for most of my adult life (when I was a first-year student in South Africa, the campus doctor prescribed a new BZD named clobazam (Urbanol, Frisium) to help me through these attacks, and I never looked back with regret on my decision to take these medications), her only response was to suggest that I try taking another BZD named lorazepam (I don’t know why, but whereas alprazolam is the BZD of choice in the NYC area, lorazepam is the BZD of choice in the UK). So I have been taking lorazepam for several years now, with no ill effects. I am well aware of the horror stories that surround lorazepam – people have suffered hallucinations, tremors, dysphoria, depersonalization, and other ugly withdrawal symptoms when deprived of lorazepam (or, for that matter, other BZDs such as diazepam, clonazepam, oxazepam, etc.). However, on those occasions when I have been deprived of lorazepam (for example, when visiting my family in South Africa), the worst I have ever suffered has been a few days of discomfort. Lorazepam is highly effective in aborting a panic attack (in my case) before it has a chance to establish itself, and I give eternal thanks to the men and women who first synthesized drugs from this class, notwithstanding the attitudes of so many clinicians, some of whom flatly refuse to prescribe any drug from these class.

My suggestion to you is that you find a pain management specialist as opposed to a general practitioner. Before leaving the US, I took a consulting assignment in Chicago. My NYC doctor was unwilling to continue sending me prescriptions for more than a couple of months, so I did my homework on the Internet and found a pain management specialist. I gave him copies of my medical records, and he did not hesitate to continue my pain management regimen.

There are doctors out there who will help patients who are in genuine need of powerful pain medications. I think that one of the reasons so many US doctors are afraid to prescribe drugs such as OxyContin and MS Contin is due to fear of being audited by the D.E.A. and by state licensing authorities. Sadly, there is a trend in US society to confuse sound medical practice with its abuse, and to inscribe draconian remedies into the law in response to this confusion. Sound medical judgment should not be second-guessed by bureaucrats, uninhibited by wisdom, knowledge, or experience – but all too often, this happens in the US. Furthermore, the US culture is complicit in portraying those men and women who suffer from chronic pain as drug addicts and basket cases. A prominent case in point is the hit TV series “House”, in which the protagonist is sent for rehab because he took the whopping dose of 80 mg hydrocodone every day! “House” has done more to damage the cause of those men and women who suffer from chronic pain than any official decision could ever have done, and it literally turns my stomach to see Vicodin (and similar drugs) portrayed in the one-sided and negative light that is shed on them by this TV series.

(In the interests of full disclosure – after being diagnosed with Marfan syndrome and after being prescribed OxyContin, I was also prescribed hydrocodone with acetaminophen (APAP) for the control of “breakthrough” pain. Hydrocodone is not available here in the UK, which is why I now take OxyNorm and Co-codamol for the treatment of breakthrough pain.)

Another terrible sadness looms ahead. The FDA’s advisory panel has recommended the withdrawal of compound analgesics such as Vicodin and Percocet, ostensibly because addicts are damaging their livers by taking too many of these pills, thereby ingesting too much paracetamol. Since when, in any sane society, is law and public policy with respect to the availability of medication driven by the behaviour of idiots and fools? Since when is the availability of a useful drug curtailed in a sane society because some people choose to abuse this drug? On what planet are we living? The FDA has yet to decide whether or not to adopt the recommendation of its advisory panel, but should it do so, many doctors foresee even more suffering and pain, as those doctors who currently prescribe Schedule III preparations are prohibited from doing so and are instead forced to choose between prescribing Schedule II preparations and perhaps having their prescribing habits scrutinized by ignorant bureaucrats.

I am glad, for my own sake, that I no longer live in the USA.


PHILIP CHANDLER


Thank you for your comments on the use of strong pain drugs. I have been on them since returning from SE Asia in 1968 with severe back damage and an inoperable bullet fragment in L4. Most US physicians are ignorant of proper pain management and the drugs that are used to treat chronic pain, not to mention afraid to use them for fear of the government. More recently, Obama Care has caused Kaiser, my HMO to all but stop prescribing OxyContin and they put me through needless pain trying to find a substitute that would work. Finally I was allowed to use Oxy again, ending my ordeal, however it may only be temporary.

Hopefully a new laser surgery technique will be able to repair my back and as soon as I save up another 20,000 I am going to get the surgery done. I look forward to being pain free for the first time since 1967, the first time in 45 years.

Thanks...
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tallent wrote:


Hello, many people are addicted to OxyContin, so you shouldn’t be surprised that the doctors are suspicious. Very often “patients” come to them asking for this drug and pretend to have the symptoms of severe pain. The street prices of OxyContin are huge, and they range from $5 to $10 for a 10 mg pill, from $10 to $20 for a 20 mg pill, from $25 to $40 for a 40 mg pill and a 80 mg pill cost unbelievable $65 to $80. This street price of OxyContin only shows how much people abuse this narcotic pain reliever. In producing opiate-like effects, it is similar to codeine, methadone, and morphine. In pharmacies, it is sold for oral usage, but abusers take it by chewing the tablets, crushing them and snorting the powder and by intravenous injections. There are some mild side effects, like nausea, drowsiness and constipation, but an acute overdose can cause skeletal muscle flaccidity, constricted pupils, respiratory depression, coma and even death!! So, be very careful if you start using this drug again.


I find it reprehensible to treat a patient like a drug abuser. This war on drugs is really a war on people. Many of those who buy these medications on the streets do so because doctors don't feel comfortable prescribing them because of pressure from the DEA. They turn to the streets, and despite having a valid need for such medications they automatically get labeled as a criminal. The doctor has a moral responsibility "to do no harm". If someone is in irretractable pain and suffering, which causes high blood pressure and hart rate - that in many cases leads to heart attack or stroke - he is doing harm. So what if some bad people sell their medications after faking - that a police and DEA problem. The Doctor should do everything he can to alleviate the pain as soon as possible. If however the patient abuses their trust, the doctor must discontinue prescribing such medications and turn them in to the police if he discovers they have diverted their medications illegally. There are ways to ensure that patients are using their medications and not selling them. Random drug tests are a great way to see if they are taking them or not. If the urine or blood come back without oxycodone and its metabolites in their system the patient is obviously NOT taking these medications and selling them. This is part of the contract a pain management doctor will have you sign along with many other criteria. The doctor should do his job, PERIOD!

There is nothing to be ashamed of when it comes to needing to use these medications as long as you use them as prescribed and you are responsible and honest. For 5000 years these medications were available over the counter without a script. In 1914 the harrison act, which was supposed to only TAX opium and its derivatives somehow created an out of control DEA and drug war we cannot win. The same uptight religious zealots then created prohibition. Make no mistake, this is a war on people not drugs. If more people were in pain the opiates would have been decriminalized as well and simply taxed, controlled and regulated rather than have an underground criminal element with BILLIONS of dollars worth of power and its effect on those nations, the people, and crimes such as murder and corruption.

I ask you, what would be better ? Tallent, you're a jerk. People like you are "spreading the gospel about the problems with drugs" either because you yourself ABUSED them or feel obligated by GOD to carry this message out. Either way - knock it off. People are in pain. Maybe you are too, but all pain is not created equal. Many people like Blancett have pain so bad they cannot do anything. Without this necceary drug their lives are difficult if not impossible. So please, knock off the soap box act, ok?

As for the drug itself it is one of the safest medications in history. Every few years because of pressure by the DEA, new drugs are created that are not narcotics. There is a cyclical story that keeps repeating. A new wonder drug like Vioxx is announced. It is a non narcotic option. People took it and then found that a very high percentage of people had heart complications from the drug. So they RECALLED IT. Then another drug came along called Darvocet which was a non-narcotic wonder drug too. A few years later they noticed a VERY high rate of kidney and liver failure and death. Now there is lyrica.. another "wonder" drug that helps pain patients that is not a narcotic. When I took this medication it made me feel more intoxicated than ever before in my life. Narcotic or not, its intoxicating.. more so than my oxycodone, oxycontin pills, amitriyptoline or any amount of alcohol I have ever drank in my entire life (which is not very much at all actually). The other problem with Lyrica is when I started getting about 7 pounds a week weight gain from it, I tried getting off and got some of the worst withdrawal symptoms I could have ever imagined. I guarantee that in the future there will be a recall. I had a 103.6 degree temperature and was rushed to the ER the first week I started using it (about 5-6 days into it).

So what is the big deal about narcotics? NOTHING. Narcotics have been used safely for 5000 years for legitimate pain patients with a very small percentage of addiction. Only people who either have a predisposition to addiction, have abused oxycodone in the past or did not take the medication as prescribed had a problem. For those who took their medicine as directed there is a .005 percent chance of addiction for a patient. That is very small.

Including ALL valid users and abusers of oxycodone (the active ingredient in oxycontin) - and of those who died with oxycontin in their system, 95% of them had alcohol or other drugs such as cocaine, Heroin, PCP, etc in their system. Of all the tens of thousands of deaths from oxycodone (in any form) only about 25 have died from just oxycodone alone in the past 10 years. But even if you included those who abused the drug, and combined it with other drugs or alcohol, the number of people who died of this drug is insignificant compared to smoking or alcohol alone.

In conclusion - the only reasons for an anti-opiate campaign are either lack of knowledge, a drug company trying to sell their non-narcotic drugs or religious-non scientific reasons. None are looking out for your best interests and have an agenda. People who opt to suffer in pain have a higher blood pressure and heart rate which absolutely lead to heart attack and stroke - which are far worse than the .005% chance of addiction. Just use the medication as directed and be honest about your pain to the doctor and you will be fine. Don't allow people with alterior motives to steer you in the wrong direction.

NOTE: I am a current pain patient. I was hurt on the job as a pilot. While disabling my aircraft at the end of my flying day - I fell off the airplane and hurt my neck and spine in several places as well as my left knee back in November 2010. I was not a drinker, I never tried any drugs, I never partied... So I personally felt bad about taking narcotic pain medications when I got hurt. I have done a lot of research on them as a result of my dependance on them to give me a somewhat normal life since my accident. There are a lot of powers at play in the war on drugs and the DEA has even attacked pain doctors for prescribing these medications for valid reasons. This is one of the reasons why there is an anti-opiate campaign because basically no one wants you to get these much needed medications anymore. This is a very dangerous situation because if they succeed pain patients will and currently do suffer. Many patients, friends of mine are denied these medications despite having even more significant injuries than mine... despite the DEA's promise to leave patients and doctors alone. They say they only prosecute or investigate the BAD GUYS - but that is absolutely not the case. for those of you who either want my references or wish to do further research - please post replies and we will find a way to exchange emails (not openly on this forum for obvious reasons) and I will forward you many sources you can read up on the subject.

PS> spelling was not checked - my back hurts too much to care about spelling sorry
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That's a rip off
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Who are you to say that the person asking for this medication doesn't need it. Just because they don't list every medical condition they are suffering from doesn't mean they are not in sever pain. I find it callous that someone like yourself could be so obtuse to someone who might suffer from the same ailments as you. It's not shame on them, shame on you. How dare you assume someone isn't suffering when you have nothing to go on but a hunch. I'm sorry you're in pain and it sounds agonizing but don't let that pain turn you into a misanthrope. I would expect a little more compassion from someone who lives for God.
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Guest 123 - who are talking to. If you are talking to me - I don't understand why you would say it. I am pro opiate for people who need it. I used to be extremely anti drug. When I had my kidney stone I refused to take my medication, and they say its one of the most painful things a person can have. But then I got hurt really bad - and now I see the other side. I think the problem is people cant understand the need for pain management by use of opiates. They are reluctant to write scripts for the patient who needs more than a norco or percocet. People are really suffering. On one hand the DEA has crossed a line and is not going after doctors they decide did something wrong - not understanding titration. On the other hand, the doctors think that opiates are the problem. A doctor actually told me that opiates do not lower pain levels and it is all addiction. Thats BS. Just because you might be taking 180mg of oxycodone and oxycontin a day - but I am over 300 pounds now - and the injury occured two years ago. tolerance is high, and the multiple injuries are severe. I wish I knew about DXM sooner..thats for sure. Now I cant even find a doctor willing to treat me in the chicago area. the VAST majority of doctors do not understand pain. They never were taught it, they don't know how to address it, and they are intimidated by the DEA and avoid them as much as humanly possible.
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Stop crying. Stop taking drugs. You have the ability to control your own "breakthrough pain" I've been doing it for 15 years without any pain medication!
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