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I was always thinking that deaths secondary to snake bites are rare. I had been reading how with the proper use of antivenin, they are becoming rarer still. The national average has been less than four deaths per year for the last several years, but I found something strange. I read most deaths are not reported and there are different kinds of venom that snakebite gives us. That is why I would like to hear more about this topic, how snakebite does affects people.

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Snake venom is produced and stored in paired glands below their eye. It is discharged from hollow fangs located in the upper jaw during snakebite. Venom dosage per bite depends on the elapsed time since the last bite, the degree of threat the snake feels, and the size of the prey, so it cannot be specified. Venom that snake produces is mostly water. Enzymatic proteins in venom impart its destructive properties we are afraid. Proteases, collagenase, and arginine ester hydrolase were substances that have been identified in pit viper venom. Neurotoxins comprise the majority of coral snake venom and huge danger of snakebite. I could tell you that hyaluronidase allows rapid spread of venom through subcutaneous tissues by disrupting mucopolysaccharides. Phospholipase A2 plays a major role in hemolysis secondary to the esterolytic effect on red cell membranes and promotes muscle necrosis, which is also affect of snakebite. Furthermore, thrombogenic enzymes promote the formation of a weak fibrin clot, which, in turn, activates plasmin. This is resulting in a consumptive coagulopathy and its hemorrhagic consequences of snake venom and snakebite.
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