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I have been diagnosed with mastocytosis few months ago. My doctor told me that should be a disorder characterized by mast cell proliferation and accumulation within various organs. He said it happens most commonly in the skin. However, I was scared when I have heard it could affect central nervous system as well. Can you tell me something more about this disease because now I am worried a lot?

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There are many different types of cutaneous mastocytosis. It includes solitary mastocytoma, diffuse erythrodermic mastocytosis, paucicellular mastocytosis, and urticaria pigmentosa. The last one is the most common form of masotcytosis, and is characterized by oval or round red-brown macules. This might also occur as papules, or plaques ranging in number from a few to thousands. Mastocytosis probably is a hyperplastic response to an unknown stimulus rather than a neoplastic condition. Increased local concentrations of soluble mast cell growth factor in lesions of cutaneous mastocytosis are believed to stimulate mast cell proliferation. Beside this problem, it could also be a melanocyte proliferation and melanin pigment production. The induction of melanocytes explains the hyperpigmentation that commonly is associated with cutaneous mast cell lesions in mastocytosis. Associated systemic manifestations are believed to reflect the release of mast cell derived mediators, such as histamine. However, this is not the only one mediator, but there are also prostaglandins, heparin, neutral proteases, and acid hydrolases. Symptoms and signs induced by mediators of mastocytosis may include headache, flushing, dizziness, tachycardia, hypotension, syncope, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. The skeletal, hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, cardiopulmonary, and central nervous systems may be involved directly, via mast cell infiltration, or indirectly, via mast cell mediator release.
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