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I had chance to see that leprosy is a chronic infectious disease, which attacks the skin, peripheral nerves and mucous membranes. I saw that when my friend had infection of his eyes and respiratory tract, due to leprosy infection. He told me that leprosy is also known as Hansen’s disease, which his doctor explained to him. I want to hear where this second term did come from. In addition, I would like to hear what you could tell me more about leprosy, and its treatment.

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This second name of Hensen’s disease came from the scientist who discovered leprosy. It happens because the bacillus, which causes this problem, was discovered by Hansen in 1873. It is most common in warm, wet areas in the tropics and subtropics, so treatment with Dapsone is currently being used to suppress leprosy. Seldom is leprosy completely removed from the body, but it can only be halted using a multi-drug treatment. Of the approximately two million cases, only one million are being treated in this way. In addition, patients are taught to take care of themselves. It should be done by using a kind of visual check if they have significant nerve damage. Without the sensations of pain to identify cuts and bruises, patients must watch themselves constantly. Leprosy is characterized by multiple lesions accompanied by sensory loss that happens in the affected areas. Usually, sensory loss begins in the extremities such as toes and fingertips. In many advanced cases of leprosy, gangrene sets in, causing parts of the body to die, and become deformed.
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I have quite a few questions regarding lepracy. I was wondering, do people ever get over lepracy once they get it? Is it possible to get complety rid of it? Is there a way to have children while having lepracy? Will the child have it if it is possible to have children? Once a person has lepracy, if it is in an incurable state, what is the typical lifespan of that person?

Thanks so Much!
Concerned Human
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There is treatment available for Leprosy. After one dose the person is no longer infectious. The World Health Organization recommends the use of a combination of three antibiotics--dapsone, rifampin, and clofazimine--for treatment, which takes six months to a year or more.
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