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While I was on work, I have heard my friends talking about woman with anisocoria. I didn’t understand anything, but I was ashamed to be the only one who didn’t know what that is. That’s why I need to found out what anisocoria is and something more about it. I worried because they said it is almost normal, and approximately 20% of population has that. How come I have never heard for that if that is so common?

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I am sure you say person with anisocoria at least once in your life and you will knew what that is when I tell you. Probably word confused you, so you think that is something new. Anisocoria is unequal size of the pupils with many benign and life-threatening etiologies. Clinical setting and a careful physical examination can stratify the etiology of anisocoria and determine cause of it. That will help to decide whether the patient needs emergent imaging, urgent referral, or routine follow-up care. Pupil size is governed by the tone of the pupillary sphincter and pupillary dilatators muscles. Those respond to ambient light, adrenergic tone and local pharmacologic or pathophysiologic conditions. Any condition resulting in an inflammatory response within the anterior chamber may cause spasm within the spincter muscle. This is one of the reasons why anisocoria could occur. Other important causes of irregular pupils with poor light reflex are congenital malformation of the iris. Then postoperative changes and posttraumatic mydriasis due to tears in the iris and its sphincter muscle.
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