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Hello, folks. I have been suffering from hypothyroidism for a certain period of time. I am on levothyroxine. I must admit that I lost some weight with this drug. I wonder whether this is normal or not. I would really appreciate if anyone could tell me this. Thank you in advance.

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Hi, there. People with hypothyroidism usually have more weight. Thyroxine is a hormone that stimulates metabolism. Since there is a lack of thyroxine within these people, it is normal to expect some weight gain. Now, you are taking synthetic thyroxine – levothyroxine which stimulates your metabolism. It is normal to lose some weight. However, if this progresses, report it to your endocrinologist. I hope this helps. Good luck! Bye!
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My 17 yr old son is on Levothyroixn and Cydomel ( i think thats how to spell it) and has lost almost 50 lbs. with stomach problems, swollen small intestines, swollen abdomal lymph nodes, If anyone knows anything pls i beg tell me
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Hello diannalk,

I read something very interesting about Levothyroxine (Synthroid) and liothyroxine (Cytomel) taken together.

Below is the doctor's answer to a question that relates to your concern:

Doctor's Response:

The thyroid gland produces the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). The thyroid gland produces more T4 than T3, and, in fact, most of the T3 in the body actually results from conversion of T4 to T3 outside the thyroid gland. T4 and T3 have the same effects on the body, and increasing doses of either cause the thyroid gland to make less thyroid hormones. (This is referred to as "feedback inhibition," in which the levels of a chemical in the body regulates its own production.) T3 is more potent that T4, which means that one mg of T3 has a greater effect on the body than one mg of T4.

Levothyroxine (Synthroid) is a synthetic version of T4, and liothyronine (Cytomel) is a synthetic version of T3. Both are used for the treatment of hypothyroidism, but levothyroxine is preferred because T3 is absorbed from the intestine very rapidly, and this may cause mild thyroid hormone toxicity (hyperthyroidism) in some patients. Also, the test that measures the level of T4 in the blood (TT4) is not useful when T3 is administered. (Specifically, if TT4 is used to monitor the adequacy of treatment when T3 is administered, it shows a low level of T4 which can lead to the erroneous decision to administer more T3.) Finally, since T4 is converted to T3 in the body, there is no advantage to administering T3 products.


I hope this helps you understand so you can discuss it with your son's doctor.

Good Luck!

Beth
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Hello diannalk,

I read something very interesting about Levothyroxine (Synthroid) and liothyroxine (Cytomel) taken together.

This is the doctor's answer to a question that relates to your concern:

Doctor's Response:

The thyroid gland produces the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). The thyroid gland produces more T4 than T3, and, in fact, most of the T3 in the body actually results from conversion of T4 to T3 outside the thyroid gland. T4 and T3 have the same effects on the body, and increasing doses of either cause the thyroid gland to make less thyroid hormones. (This is referred to as "feedback inhibition," in which the levels of a chemical in the body regulates its own production.) T3 is more potent that T4, which means that one mg of T3 has a greater effect on the body than one mg of T4.

Levothyroxine (Synthroid) is a synthetic version of T4, and liothyronine (Cytomel) is a synthetic version of T3. Both are used for the treatment of hypothyroidism, but levothyroxine is preferred because T3 is absorbed from the intestine very rapidly, and this may cause mild thyroid hormone toxicity (hyperthyroidism) in some patients. Also, the test that measures the level of T4 in the blood (TT4) is not useful when T3 is administered. (Specifically, if TT4 is used to monitor the adequacy of treatment when T3 is administered, it shows a low level of T4 which can lead to the erroneous decision to administer more T3.) Finally, since T4 is converted to T3 in the body, there is no advantage to administering T3 products.


By reading this, I supect that you son might be receiving to much of the T3 hormone which could be causing these severe side effects. :)

I hope this information helps you so it can be discussed it with your son's doctor.

Good Luck!

Beth
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what mg OF YOUR LEVOTHROXINE?

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This doesn't sound correct. I take Cytomel and I feel a lot better.

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I havent yet but its been only a month. did you loose , I know your post is over a year now. please let me know how it did for you. I am very worried. some people say you are supposed to not gain and loosing is slow but I have no clue
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How long does it take to start working. a month and ive lost not even a lb.
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A lot of doctors only prescribe T4. The problem with that is if your T4 is not being converted to T3 by your body, then you need the Cytomel. You may only need T3 and not T4 at all.
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