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I have just read that Peter McAllister, said that the neanderthal woman were so strong that even Schwarzenegger could get out as a winner in a ring with her.
He also said that a Roman soldier was able to march one-and-a-half marathons in a single day, Rwandan Tutsi men could jump higher then the current world record of 2.45 meters.

Now these are some interesting facts if you ask me. I would like to hear your opinion on this matter.

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Wow so we are getting weaker and weaker every millennium. :-) o.O 8-|
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Health Ace
6880 posts
I wouldn't have thought that to be the case. Humans seem to be continually out doing their predecessors on all fronts. Our athletes are always setting new records, many of which wouldn't have seemed possible when I was young. In general, today's humans are taller than their predecessors mainly due to better health and in particular, better nutrition.

However there certainly have been some warfare specialties from the past that seem pretty amazing. It's hard to believe that female archers cut away part of their breasts to reduce interferrence with the bow string. Yeowwch!!!!!!!

The Romans were definitely superb infantrymen. Boudicca wiped out 2 Roman legions and was hot on the trail of Suetonius after burning two cities to the ground along with killing 70 to 80 thousand Roman inhabitants when he found the perfect spot to take a stand. Outnumbered something like 10 to 1, he defeated her with superior tactics. She came within a gnats eye of driving the Romans out of England, but not quite.

Of course modern infantrymen don't specialize in long distance marching because it's much more effective to transport them by other means. However, do you think you or I could survive fighting or just walking around all day in the heat of Iraq wearing 70 to 100 pounds of body armor and equipment? When I was in the army, we didn't wear the battle rattle today's troops do. We didn't even have it.
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Hi njoynlife.
You have a few really interesting facts. But one thing is that people back then did not train for anything, it was just the way they were. (I'm talking for the Neanderthals). Romans were professional soldiers and because of their tactics and endurance they managed to spread they territory throughout the Europe all the way to England.
Also today many of us don't have to be that strong to live and survive, nowadays it has become an option if you would like to run a marathon with 50lbs on your back. :-)
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Well Neanderthals technically aren't of our species so that isn't surprising. As for the soldiers and warriros, that's something different altogether. How is he able to test that though? I am curious to hear what his methodology is.
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Health Ace
6880 posts
healthnfitnessguy wrote:

Well Neanderthals technically aren't of our species so that isn't surprising. quote]

Maybe not your's, but I know some guys who may be related to them.

I sent my DNA sample in to the National Geographic genographic project a few years ago. I now have a map that shows just where I came from. Along with a description of my ancestors journey. It's really interesting. You can Google that project to find out more. It looks like they are still accepting samples if you want to know more about your ancestors. But it'll cost ya. They don't do it for free.

I get emails telling me about others with the same DNA heritage characteristics and of course if I want to send more money they are researching it down to a closer level so eventually I might be able to know about actual relatives in the area/world. Of course that would be limited by the fact that they would also have to be participants in the study.

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I was reading about that last year I think. It seamed very interesting.
So you did that. And what exactly did you need to do? Just send a sample and that's it?
Do you maybe know how much do they charge now and is it too expensive?
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Health Ace
6880 posts
Here's a link to the Nat Geo site

https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/participate.html



If they take that out you can find it by Googling genographic project.



They still have a link to purchase the kit. It's $99.95. Looks like a bargain special, I paid $107.50 in October of 2005.



If you Google "haplogroup R1B" you can find the same map I have.

Mine is R1B M343



I wanted to know what they said about mine because I can drink milk with no bad side effects. My wife cannot, and most adults I know, cannot. It is supposed to be an indicator that I descended from a certain area of Europe and their map and description of my haplogroup does show that.



I found this recently:



THE first adult milk drinkers came from central Europe, not Scandinavia as was thought.



Unlike more than half of the world's people, most northern Europeans can digest milk, thanks to a gene that enables lactose digestion throughout adulthood.



It was thought the gene first arose in Scandinavia, where lactose tolerance is most prevalent, because it is a way of getting vitamin D in places with little sunshine, says Mark Thomas of University College London. His team have now narrowed down the emergence of the gene to a tribe of cattle herders living around 7500 years ago between the Balkans and central Europe (PLoS Computational Biology, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000491).
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Actually Healthnfitnessguy there is a theory that Neanderthals were genetically similar enough to homo sapiens so that they were able to have kids together, and that we are actually a combination of the two species. I don't know if it's true, but food for thought.
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Health Ace
6880 posts
I read that somewhere too. They think they may have lived in the same areas at the same time and probably interbred.
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Hi njoynlife,

Interesting cause. I too can drink milk with no side effects, an many people I know can too. This is getting me more and more interested. Have you found anything else about your ancestors? How detailed information did you receive from them?
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Health Ace
6880 posts
Their research doesn't bring us very close to the present so I don't have as much information as I would like. However they appear to be continuing the research. They also have other research projects that I can subscribe to (more money --- surprise, surprise). Those don't appear to be done by them so It's not quite like they are trying to get more money from me.

I'm going to wait a while to see what comes up before I spend any more money. It looks like thay are trying to get the DNA connections up to where I can know about other people living today who are related. The only drawback I can see with that is they would have to have submitted their DNA also. That would certainly limit the usefulness of that part. There may be 50 people within a few miles of me who share the same recent relative but if only 2 of us have sent in DNA samples then only the two of us will ever know about each other.
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Maybe it is because we are using more technology now. They almost didn't have anything back then. Maybe a few rocks and bones, and that's it. We don't use bones anymore, but rocks we sometimes trow. :-)
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