Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

User avatar
Celebrity
478 posts

Hey,

There is another thread about postpartum depression vs the baby blues at the moment, and I just wanted to clarify something if someone knows.

To be diagnosed with clinical depression, there's usually a requirement that symptoms have been present for a certain amount of time. Is that the case with postpartum depression? In other words, is there a time period before which a woman cannot be diagnosed with postpartum depression, such as she has to be at least two weeks postpartum, or is that not true and can a new mom be diagnosed as soon as she shows postpartum depression signs?

Rosie

Loading...

I am actually not quite sure. Everything that I've read (because I am pregnant and I do have a family but not a personal history of depression) says that it's normal to experience the baby blues, that it normally kicks in after a few days and lasts up to two weeks, and that 80 percent or so of all new moms go through it. A note to talk to your OBGYN if you're still feeling down after those two weeks are up usually follows. 

It makes sense to only get help for postpartum depression once you're sure it's not the baby blues, which passes all by itself, but on the other hand, I fully assume that moms who are feeling suicidal or who have thoughts of harming their babies are immediately diagnosed with postpartum depression. Suicidal and other thoughts related to physical harm aren't in the realm of the baby blues, after all. 

Reply

Loading...

The signs of postpartum depression can become apparent as soon as a few days after birth, so within the period many women are affected by the Baby Blues. There are some key differences between the Baby Blues and diagnosible postpartum depression, and any woman or their loved ones who think they're seeing postpartum depression within two weeks after delivery should feel free to look for assistance right away and not wait those two weeks out before finally talking to someone. It is never too early to reach out for help. The Baby Blues is a mild feeling of being low and melancholic, but depression is much more full on. 

Reply

Loading...

Earliest time? Before the baby's even born!!! Many women get antenatal depression during pregnancy, and I think if a woman has that during pregnancy, it's not gonna just go away the minute the baby is born, kwim? And it's all caused by pregnancy hormones and stuff like that. So antenatal depression is basically postnatal depression before you're postnatal... and with that, basically, the earliest time postnatal depression can occur.

If you just feel a bit down, without serious thoughts of harming yourself or anyone else and whilst still being able to enjoy life the rest of the time apart from the moments you have those thoughts, I think that's the Baby Blues?

Reply

Loading...

That's right; it's not uncommon for a woman to show the first signs of postpartum depression while she is still pregnant. She may resist seeking help both because she thinks pregnancy is supposed to be a time of happiness and she is afraid of people thinking she is a bad mother, and because she may think antidepressants during pregnancy are unsafe and so there's nothing she can do anyway. 

With a baby to look after, the depression, which might continue, becomes even harder to manage. The hormonal changes, physical exhaustion from pregnancy and birth, and sleep deprivation related to having a new baby, can all make it so much harder. 

In this situation, it's so important to get help right away rather than waiting for depression to go away. 

Reply

Loading...

Well, it can be hard to tell in the beginning... as soon as my baby was born, I had a feeling something wasn't right, I was feeling tearful all the time, didn't feel that instant strong bond people talk about so much, and just didn't really feel anything at all, for anyone. It wasn't that I was sad, I was just numb. I talked to people about it... my mom, my sister, my boyfriend... all said it was probably a case of the baby blues and it would go away. It didn't. I was still feeling the same way three months later, and it was at that point I made an appointment directly with a psychologist because I thought my OBGYN and family doctor wouldn't take me seriously. 

Reply

Loading...

I was the opposite. I had never had a baby before and everything I was going through, I told myself this is just what it is like to have a baby and be a mother. I worked until the ninth month and then when the baby came I was in the house alone with the baby all day, sometimes not having stimulating adult conversation all day and going from a busy social life to everything being about the baby was hard. It didn't occur to me that it was depression until much later. I was seeing my doctor for something unrelated and he asked how was I doing. That all led to being diagnosed with postpartum depression when my baby was 6 months old. It finally made sense. I was not meant to feel like this, it was depression. It was such a relief really, getting that diagnosis. 

Moral of the story, everyone is different. But my diagnosis may have come after 6 long months, but I felt this way from day 1 after having my baby. 

Reply

Loading...