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My 10 year old daughter is overweight and I tried everything to make her lose some weight. We went to nutritionist and the diet therapy was very effective but she pretty soon regained the weight she had before. I’ve decided a month ago to finally try with some medication and she’s now on adderall one pill per every six hours. But now it seems to me that this adderall might cause her some problems for she suffers now from frequent headaches and dizziness and loss of appetite so I’d like to hear something about adderall side effects. Thanks.

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Hi there! I am on adderall for more than two years now and I never had any problem adderall related. I’ve lost a lot of weight with the adderall help and now I control my weight also with occasional use of adderall. But anyway those symptoms your daughter feels I think are normal when using adderall and won’t be lasting long I also had occasional headaches and even insomnia but it come and go or maybe it has something to do with your child’s age for she’s 9, but as I was explained adderall is the type of amphetamine that has almost the same effects on both children and adults though it’s not recommended for children under the age of 5. And you need to recheck with her doc possible developments of some other conditions regarding adderall especially when it is being used in combination with some other medications. And though as I said adderall side effects are very rare there’s of course possibility of developing some adderall side effects which is actually the case with most of medications, so besides those symptoms your daughter feels there’re some others adderall side effects such as-nervousness, irritability, unpleasant taste and dry mouth followed by nausea and vomiting sometimes but there’re also more serious adderall side effects though extremely rare such as- hypertension, rapid pulse rate, hallucinations and psychoses.
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You are going to give your child an eating disorder.
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When I was first put on adderall for A.D.D. when I was in middle school I went from 125 pounds to 73. I did have an eating disorder, but it was completely fueled by the adderall.

I feel it is my obligation to tell you that when confronted about my weight loss by family, teachers, friends, strangers, I would lie about eating meals to everyone. I made my parents go into denial about any eating disorder by saying that the adderall made me not hungry... it did, but there was much more to this, i was in fact making the decisions to harness the lack of appetite and skip meals.

When it began apparent that I was looking sick, the school had a meeting with my parents, and doctor, and they began a strict diet:
-My mom would cook me breakfast every morning and I had to finish my plate in front of her.
-They began taking me to the nurses office partially through the school day to have a healthy snack each day
-The nurses office began recording my weight once a week, which was sent to my doctor.
-My family began sitting down for meals together so that they could watch over my eating habits.

I have to tell you that what your daughter may be going through (I realize your post was posted quite some time ago,) or anyone reading this right nows' loved one, will say whatever it takes to take the questioning off of him or her. My mom is still to this day in denial of the idea that an eating disorder was part of the weight loss, because my lies were so believable. I only just confessed to her about lying of an eating disorder being present about 2 years ago, and it kills me to see her upset that she didn't know, that she didn't protect me.

**educationally, adderall was a miracle medicine for me, my grades skyrocketed, I showed interest in every subject brought up, and It was really good for me... educationally**

I just wish my eating habits had been watched MUCH more carefully in the beginning, and that my school and doctor had reacted quicker.

Eating disorders never go away, they hide, they evolve into other eating disorders such as over eating and bulimia, but it is always a present battle in one's mind. It is a battle that can be overcome, with will, and persistence, and help from loved ones.
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Serendipity1588:

I'd be interested in discussing this further, because my experience has been dramatically different from yours, and whenever there's such a large difference in experience and perspective, I think a great deal can be learned from that.

Just a little about my background: I have struggled with depression and being overweight (not morbidly obese, but still obese) for most of my life. I always felt that the overeating had something to do with the depression, but that both were really symptoms of something else that no one seemed to be able to identify. The something else turned out to be ADD. I was diagnosed in March and began taking Adderall at the beginning of April. I've lost 60 pounds and would like to lose another 15, but my weight seems to be stabilizing. It may take another six months to lose that remaining 15. Most importantly, I feel great. I'm happier than I've ever been, noticeably calmer and less stressed out, even though nothing about my situation has changed significantly other than the diagnosis and treatment of my ADD.

I'm now thoroughly convinced that my depression was caused by my ADD. All my life I've been told that I was smart, but I wasn't living up to my potential. People think, when they look at someone with an extraordinarily high IQ, that if they're not capable of getting good grades, doing excellent research and performing extraordinarily on the job, they must have something wrong with them, but ADD isn't what immediately comes to mind. What does come to mind is that you're just not applying yourself; you lack discipline; you are a cosmic f---up and a waste of human potential.

After you hear that kind of thing enough from people in positions of trust you start to believe it, and you start to beat yourself up. Every time something goes wrong in your life you start reciting the same litany of reasons why it's all your fault. To a therapist, this type of reaction looks completely out of proportion to the event or events that precipitated it, so they pretty consistently conclude that it's just another case of clinical depression, maybe even MDD, or they notice that your mood tends to worsen periodically and say, ah-ha! It's bipolar disorder!

So in my case, my mood improved dramatically the minute I understood that there was actually something wrong with me that had a name and a possible treatment. With that, my emotional needs for food went away--no more "stress-eating," no more "comfort foods," no more cravings.

When I started taking Adderall, it did reduce my appetite, but I was already losing weight. I also found that even when I did feel hungry, I had the self-control to decide whether or not it was appropriate to eat. I was now making decisions about food based on things like how many calories I'd consumed that day, whether or not the food I was considering would be good for me or not--real rational criteria for a change. I'm not sure if this change is just a result of my not feeling emotionally pressured to eat or just another example of the way Adderall tends to help people with ADD generally make better choices, or maybe it's all the same thing.

So my response to the Adderall was really very different from yours. In my case, the diagnosis of my condition obliterated a long-standing eating disorder, and the Adderall provided additional support to help me bring my weight under control. In your case, it sounds like you have an undiagnosed, untreated eating disorder that the Adderall "helped" by supporting your inappropriate choices.

The first thing I'd like to suggest is that you think seriously abut whether your food issues might have something to do with your ADD, as mine did. In my case I was using food to make me feel better because I couldn't change the fact that I continually disappointed the people who loved me, and I used their expressions of disappointment and concern to excoriate myself when things went wrong. You might be doing something similar, but instead you are withholding food from yourself as a form of punishment.

You need to search your memory and try to recall any hurtful, critical things people said about you that you may have internalized and realize that you don't need them anymore. You don't need to keep punishing yourself. It wasn't your fault.

Of course there is always the possibility that your eating disorder comes from someplace else, and I'd encourage you to work with a therapist to find that connection if you're unable to do it on your own. You might have to recall some painful stuff, but once you find that connection, the results are amazing. It's like all the emotional stuff just crumbles away, and you can actually understand the whole thing intellectually, and instead of being painful and debilitating, it all just seems fascinating.

Does any of this resonate with you at all? I really hope it does.
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I completely agree with the other Guest. I know this post was so long ago but at the off chance that you get a notice for your post anyway --honestly why did you put your young daughter on a pill solely for weight loss? Unless her life was being endangered by obesity. I think you are the problem of your daughters weight "problem." Children are extremely impressionable and look to their parents for guidance. Feeling as if there is something wrong with their body image (because of their own parent) can and WILL lead to deeply rooted psychological poor self-image and self-hatred for lack of controlling their obsession with weight. Problems that, in most cases, linger permanently into adult life.
I know my case is not the same as your daughters' but while growing up both my mother and father constantly told me I needed to lose weight -- even though this was triggered by the pressure I was undergoing as a model. I had to measure myself almost everyday and was sometimes restricted food. They even went as far as to drag me to a fat removal clinic -- the only reason I got out of that was by crying in front of the doctor. I was nowhere near overweight but considered very skinny -- the modeling industry is cruel. Which by the way, many of the other girls I modeled with also had a variety of eating disorders caused by a distorted self image at such a young age. This is the reason why four Brazilian models have lost their life to anorexia (they started when they were merely 13 -- I at 14) All of this only lead to my four year depression, a period of defiance against my parents which lead to an abuse of food (food addiction) and then an addiction to bulimia. Now I am fighting against anorexia. My entire life revolves around how I feel about my body image on a daily basis. And I have parents like you to thank for that. I hope your daughter is able to see the real source of her problem before it's too late.
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my2cents wrote:

First though, I feel that using Adderall for weight loss in a 10 year old is a little extreme, JMO.



Most people think so. That's why it's only used when everything else has failed. The risks inherent in taking prescription stimulants pales in comparison to the health risks of obesity. Obesity is a disease with a significant rate of morbidity and comorbidity and serious risk of death. It's about time the medical community started treating it more aggressively.
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Using a quick fix on your child is never a good idea. It's frustrating as a parent to solve problems but the short cut method doesn't necessarily give a good message to your child. Society tells us that pills solve everything, but the long term effects can wear on your body and this drug certainly doesn't prevent heart-attacks. Children that young who are given pills are more likely to abuse hard drugs in their adolescence.

Have you considered that this may be a phase. A lot of times young girls that hit puberty early will put on more than just a couple of pounds before they start menstruating.

Adderall isn't a diet pill. Have you tried organic foods? A lot of people think dieting is just about calories. Perhaps you should see a dietician and ask about an organic diet that will give your child more energy and help her lead a more heathy life style. Certain fruits and vegetables have many health benefits as well. Remember, your child is not a robot. You don't need to give her low self-esteem by drugging her with diet pills.
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My doctor is putting me on Adderall, I work out 4 days a week each time I reach my max heart rate for at least 25 mins of my workout sessions- along with this I have dietary concerns which require me to eat carbs three times a day, minimal dairy and meat. I HAVE NOT LOST A SINGLE POUND AFTER 4 months! I am really looking forward to taking Adderall
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Adderall does the same thing to me. I'm stopping it. I also can lead to depression, insomnia and paranoia. I've experienced all of those as well. I decided today to stop it ...again. I quit taking it about a month ago and starting gaining weight so I started it back but since then I have be so anti-social, depressed, tired, dizzy, don't want to eat so I end up with a headache. It's ridiculous. If you can find some other way to help her with the weight gain, I would. Adderall was described to me by a neurosurgeon as legal meth.
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Adderall has been rx'd to some for weighloss.
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