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Hi, I’ve suffered form heart palpitations for several years. I wake up from a sleep and have a rapid hearth rhythm. Recently, I started having symptoms of asthma when I wake up. Is this normal?

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Hi, I know exactly what you’re talking about. I have asthma symptoms along with heart palpitations. It often happens when I sit still in the chair, or when I’m sleeping in bed, that I feel like I received a shot of adrenalin, and my heart beats like creasy. Beside that, I feel like I don’t have air, and that I’m choking. It’s a little better when I take a deep breath and try to calm down. I have symptoms of asthma only in conjugation with heart palpitations. I started using beta blockers few days ago, and I can’t wait to see the results. I heard that they reduce fast heart beating, and prevent developing of more serious heart disorders. I hope these drugs will reduce asthma symptoms too.
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have you been tested for asthma? because you shouldn't take beta-blockers when you have asthma. there are calcium channel blockers and beta-selective blockers though.
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Check to make sure you don't have G.E.R.D., which can cause heart palpitations.

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First of all, if you did have symptoms of asthma, your doctor would not put you on beta blockers because they depress respiration. You don't want to depress respiration if you already have breathing problems! It sounds like you did some online research, found out beta blockers reduce heart palpitations, and most likely ordered them from some online pharmacy without a prescription? Your doctor would not write a prescription for beta blockers unless you had been diagnosed with hypertension or heart arythmia. If you had gone to a doctor and had any suspicion that you had asthma, they would first of all test you to see if you had asthma. Secondly, they would investigate the palpitations further and rule out any other cause such as excess caffeine intake, hyperthyroidism, anxiety, stress etc. Often, heart palpitations are a normal response to stress and are not usually problematic unless you have an irregular heartbeat to boot. If it was show that you did have some sort of heart condition and had asthma, they would put you on a medicine other than a beta blocker due to its negative effect on respiration. DO NOT take drugs unless you have seen a licensed professional and have recieved a prescription. This kind of self diagnosis and self medication could put you in the hospital!!
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Luppy, I can tell you that is not always the case from first hand experience. I have asthma with a recent full blown attack and heart palpitations (which started before this attack)... not only did my general doctor put me on a beta blocker, but so did the cardiologist.
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I was recently diagnosed with asthma via a spirometry test by my pulmonologist. I have been on BB for about 6 years due to MVP w/ regurgitation. My pulmonoligist switched me to a different BB, but you can in fact be on BB and have asthma at the same time. You just have to be careful that the medicines to treat both conditions don't interact. That is the job of the doctor and the pharmacist, but it can be done!
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Yeh have to agree sometimes they do give BB even when you have asthma.... I have had asthma for the last 7 years.... however because I have a heart that skips beats they put me on Atenelol a BB in a very low dose not to trigger the asthmas but enough to help keep my heart at a normal heartbeat..... my Dr is a cardioligist. Everything depends on each individual case.
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i was having palpitations and racing heart, i have high blood pressure too, so the doc put me on atenolol, and i now have asthma having never been a sufferer. the doctor said beta blockers can sometimes cause bronchial asthma and thats whats happened to me. i have since been put on calcium channel blockers. i still get a 'hard' heartbeat and often get light headed, and often feel the need to take deep breaths even though i am taking both the brown and blue inhalers. i have been to the doctors countless times and feel i am just shooed away. i feel i should be getting chest x-rays and scans etc to make sure there is nothing more sinister or another cause of my problems but i'm just not taken seriously :-(
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luppy wrote:

First of all, if you did have symptoms of asthma, your doctor would not put you on beta blockers because they depress respiration. You don't want to depress respiration if you already have breathing problems! It sounds like you did some online research, found out beta blockers reduce heart palpitations, and most likely ordered them from some online pharmacy without a prescription? Your doctor would not write a prescription for beta blockers unless you had been diagnosed with hypertension or heart arythmia. If you had gone to a doctor and had any suspicion that you had asthma, they would first of all test you to see if you had asthma. Secondly, they would investigate the palpitations further and rule out any other cause such as excess caffeine intake, hyperthyroidism, anxiety, stress etc. Often, heart palpitations are a normal response to stress and are not usually problematic unless you have an irregular heartbeat to boot. If it was show that you did have some sort of heart condition and had asthma, they would put you on a medicine other than a beta blocker due to its negative effect on respiration. DO NOT take drugs unless you have seen a licensed professional and have recieved a prescription. This kind of self diagnosis and self medication could put you in the hospital!!



DO NOT POST MEDICAL ADVICE IF YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHAT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT. IT IS IRRESPONSIBLE AND DANGEROUS.

Beta blockers are a component of asthma therapy and they can induce palpitations. They allow for bronchodilation. Wikipedia/re-runs of Grey's Anatomy don't make you a doctor.
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I have recently been diagnosed with asthma and my GP has told me that I have to come off my beta blockers that I've been taking for 25 years because he said the beta blockers stop the blue and brown inhalers from working. He said that people have died because they couldn't be treated for an asthma attack due to the beta blockers stopping the inhalers from working.
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I see that this post is a little old, but just in case anyone else stumbles onto it.........there are some pieces of truth in most of the things that have been said thus far.  Beta-blockers CAN be used in patients who have asthma, but it is usually better to use the cardioselective ones, like Atenolol.  There are different types of beta-receptors in the body.  The heart contains predominantly beta-1 receptors.  The lung contains beta-2.  First generation beta-blockers block both types of receptors, which can lead to adverse respiratory effects, like bronchospasm.  2nd generation beta-blockers, like Atenolol, are more cardioselective and mainly block beta-1 receptors in the heart without blocking, or at least minimally blocking, the beta-2 receptors in the lungs.  However, the higher the dose of a cardioselective beta-blocker, the less selective it will become, and it may start to block receptors in the lungs, as well.

All that being said, in medicine, there is never a one-size-fits-all recommendation for therapy.  As far as studies have shown, cardioselective beta blockers are the ideal first choice in asthma patients with coexistent heart conditions, as far as beta-blockers are concerned.  However, if that patient is not well-controlled with a cardioselective one, they may have to try a first generation beta-blocker, or they may have to increase the dose of their cardioselective beta blocker, thus making it not much of a selective blocker anymore.  In this case, the benefits would outweigh the risks.  Do you let someone's heart conditions run rampant in order to avoid the risk of bronchospasm?  Of course not.  Now, there are different options for heart conditions, but they don't always work for everyone.  You might find a patient who isn't controlled by anything else.  In this case, you weigh benefits and risks, and you go ahead.  Every situation is different.  It's OK to post on a forum like this and let people know what worked for you or what treatment you're on, but you should always remember to preface it and explain that you're simply sharing your own, personal, subjective experience.  What works for one may work for many, but there is no one-size-fits-all.  That's why we have medical professionals to help tailor a treatment plan to our own specific needs.
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Just to amend my post above, and so there's not any confusion:  I had mentioned that sometimes benefits outweigh the risks, and a provider might go ahead with therapy that has possible negative effects.  I want to stress how important it is that you seek professional medical advice and let them tailor a treatment plan to your needs.  Going along with what one of the other posters said, if you happen to be an asthma patient who depends on your inhaler and you frequently have uncontrolled, life-threatening episodes......in this case, the benefit wouldn't outweigh the risk.  So again, this is a very delicate issue that has to be carefully considered by your health care provider.  They can determine what level of current control you have with each of your different co-exiting conditions and modify drug regimens to best suit your needs.
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"DO NOT take drugs unless you have seen a licensed professional and have received a prescription." - The problem is that we no longer live in a society where most people can afford those things and when it comes to trying to survive, they have to do what they feel is the best way to survive. Unfortunately, this will only continue to increase if you live in the US. I know some people have been able to seek treatment in Canada if they happen to live near the border.
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You mean beta agonists not beta blockers
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