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I have problem with migraine headaches for a few months. My friend told me that beta-blockers can help. I know that my mother is taking atenolol for her problem with high blood pressure and that she used to take metoprolol before. Can I take atenolol and metoprolol together? Maybe then they are more effective?

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How do you think together? Why you want to use them together? You don’t have any need for that. Those two drugs are very similar and you should use only one. But you should need to know that you have to get prescription for those drugs. So, your doctor will tell you what is better for you.
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we need not combine these two drugs since effects of the drugs are same.Individual drug dose can be increased to the recommended level if need be.However small doses of the drugs combined are likely to cause severe bradycardia and its consequences. Dr N Dasgupta MD +

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I have been taking metoprol and and atenolol together for about 7 weeks now and they work great against high heart rate and blood pressure.  I started the BP drugs for chronic atrial fibrilation and then became dependent on (read "addicted to," if this hadn't been prescribed by a physician or PA or NP) metoprolol to control BP.  I take 25mg of Atenolol per day at lunchtime to control heart rate but it doesn't help much with the blood pressure, so I take 50 mg of Metoprolol at bedtime for that.  No bradycardia etc.  My problem is to get a prescription for the combination.  It seems that research on these drugs has ended now that the patents have run out so it's like tough sh*t and scare stories for anyone who needs to use them some new way. 

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You are absolutely correct. The Atenolol works better than the Metoprolol to control heart rate, but the Metoprolol works better in controlling the BP. Why not take both? They are basically the same pill, but just a bit different...
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These cardioselective beta antagonists lessen the risk of constriction because it mainly targets beta-1 receptors. Most of the receptors found in the heart are beta-1, while the ones in the muscles of the bronchi are mostly beta-2.
Two of the most commonly used cardioselective beta-blockers are metoprolol and atenolol.

Metoprolol is used for the management of angina pectoris, high blood pressure, irregular heart rhythm and prevention of heart attacks and heart failure. It is also said to be used for migraine headaches. It has the ability to lower blood pressure and heart rate. The most common side effects of this drug are dizziness and lightheadedness.

Atenolol, since also a cardioselective beta antagonist, functions pretty much the same way as metoprolol. It is prescribed in cases of hypertension, arrhythmia and angina. These two substances have many similarities. Excessive doses of either drug can cause lowered heart rate, extreme hypotension. Both these drugs are not suitable for patients experiencing bradycardia, as these drugs lower heart rate. High doses of these substances may also create a risk of bronchoconstriction, but at normal, prescribed doses, they are less risky than non-cardioselective beta-blockers. However, patients with asthma are still advised to take these with caution. Recent studies have also shown depression and hair loss are side effects of both these drugs. Also, they both cause withdrawal symptoms when stopped suddenly.
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I take both. I took Atenolol to reduce Angina but it wasn't enough. My doctor perscribed Metoprolol to see if that would get rid of the angina.
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