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Hi, my mother was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Her whole legs and arms are tingling and weakend, and we heard that it finally leads to paralyzed extremities.

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Guillain-Barré syndrome is a disorder characterized by weakness or tingling sensations in the legs. In many cases, the weakness and abnormal sensations spread to the arms and upper parts of the body. Final state may involve even immobility induced by paralyzed muscles. This is medical emergency, since it is life-thretening. The immune system starts turns upon part of it’s own peripheral nervous system, so this is an autoimmune disorder. A few days or weeks after respiratory or gastrointestinal viral infection Guillain-Barré may occur. It is treated surgicaly or by vaccination.
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My grandson is 4yrs old and was hospitalized today with Gillian Bere Syndrome. He can''t walk. He is in good spirits and does not relize this is very serious.

What can you do to help the immune system or protect the mylian sheeth?
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Unfortunately there is no cure for GBS. Gillispie said that it is treated surgicaly or by vaccination and this is totally untrue. Your grandson should be given IVIg or Plasmapharesis to try and stop further attack. IVIg is less invasive and should be the first choice but just as effective as Plasmapharesis. This treatment should only be given within the first 4 weeks, as after that if it is GBS, the treatment wont be effective as at that stage the attack on the myelin or the axons have already taken place and the damage has been done. These treaments are not CURE'S, only something given to try, as I said before, to try and stop the attack, and to try and help recovery, so therefore it wont 'make him better' as such. If it has not been done, it may just take a little longer for recover, and recovery can take a long time. After physical signs dissapear, fatigue and pain still sometimes linger. It is important that he has physical therapy, even if he wasnt effected too much.

How is your grandson doing now? Do you have any further questions that I can try and help you with?
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Hi,

My partner was diagnosed with GBS as a child and has had 2 attacks (20 years apart).  The second attack required hospitalisation and required rehabilitation to learn to walk again.  As she approaches 20 years from her previous attack I am wondering if there is anything that she can to do make herself less susseptable to attack?

I understand with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) that weight/resistance training can help to remain strong and help to minimise the intensity of attacks, but I was wondering if this would have a similar result with GBS?

Most of the information I have found talks about what to do during and immediately after an attack, but what can we actively do to help reduce the likelyhoon and severity of an attack when she is not suffering any symptoms?

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