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I started a new blog, and as of now my focus is on health. Can you please look at it and comment on the articles up there. Would be greatly appreciated. Here is the link:


THANKS [/url]

***edited by moderator*** web addresses not allowed

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Hi there, you usually can't post links on the forum like that. But do you mind telling us a little more about what the blog is about? I would appreciate hearing more about it. Thanks!
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Oops sorry, as of now the only posts up there are medical things, and one post about the nuss procedure. Its good quality though
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I know this is off topic, but if there's a moderator passing by...

Why are links always removed? The terms of use just mentions: "No posting of external links to irrelevant web sites.". Surely this wasn't irrelevant?
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Hi,
It also says: No web or email addresses in signatures, except you achieved a “global member” rank title (after 50 posts).

This is one of the rules and we have to oblige to respect it. If we would let everyone to post web or email addresses there would be a lot of spammers then.
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Thanks for clearing that up red :-)
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dark_red I have noticed that a lot of spammers do try to do that. But thank you for clearing that up! I didn't know that there was a 50 post limit. :-)
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What is the nuss procedure, by the way? I forgot to ask about it and I wanted to hear a little more about it. Can you let me know? Thanks!
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Taken from my blog:
This is the revolutionary procedure for the treatment of Pectus Excavatum! And I can vouch for that because I have had it done in May of 2009, still have the bar in, but Im feeling great! This procedure was created by Donald Nuss at Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters in Norfolk, Virginia. The best part is, I live only an hour away from the hospital, so I had my surgery at the hospital that pioneered this technique! Surgical correction of pectus excavatum is done for medical reasons. Children with moderate to severe Pectus Excavatum often experience shortness of breath, exercise intolerance and chest pain. These are the results of compression and displacement of the heart and secondary lung compression. After a complete health history, a thorough physical exam, chest measurements, and photographs, children whose condition is considered severe enough to warrant surgery are sent for further evaluation of their cardiac status, pulmonary function, and a CT scan. This means its time for an echocardiogram and spirometry tests(which I hate so much, they make you feel light-headed)! The operation for correction starts with general anesthesia and the placement of an epidural for the management of pain after the operation, like when females give birth, except placed higher up. Two lateral incisions are made on either side of the chest for the curved steel bar to be placed under the sternum. A separate, small lateral incision is made to allow for a small camera for direct visualization(I have pictures from my inside of my heart before and after the procedure, it was completely crushed before and then healthy afterwards) as the bar is passed under the sternum. It is then fixed to the ribs on either side and the incisions are closed and dressed. The bar is not visible from the outside and stays in place for a minimum of two years. When it is time, the bar is removed as an outpatient procedure. The procedure generally takes a little over an hour, but mine took about 3 because some work needed to be done on my heart because it was crushed from my chest being caved-in so much(Oh joy). The most common complication is pneumothorax, but it is easily treated with aggressive breathing exercises. Recovery time in the hospital is 4-5 days if everything is clear, but I stayed an extra day and a half because I couldn't keep down any food(AS if chest surgery wasn't enough!). After 2-4 years, the bar is removed in an outpatient procedure.

You can also go to Childrens Hospital of the Kings Daughters website for more info
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Hi there, thanks so much for posting that from your blog. It was really informative and I feel like I learned a lot. Did you write and research the whole thing yourself?
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Yep I wrote and researched myself. I wrote about it for a biology assignment my last school year
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Yeh agreed with healthguy. Some very good information there. Can I have any clues as to your web address? I know your not allowed to post it but something along the lines of if i type xxxxxxx into my browser. I can guess the .com/.net bit :-)


Just one thing, you say it was for your school project. How does it work in America is that a pre-16 assignment?

You have to be careful posting your own academic work on the internet, though I don't know what the rules are over there; over here that could bring plagiarism accusations against you or even a breach of copyright.
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It was for a summer assignment for dual enrollment biology(college level biology course). Im taking it my junior year of high school and it was graded over the summer already. I havent posted anything on my blog for awhile have been really busy. But i type whatsgoingonthiscentury.blogspot into my browser to go to it. and cant forget the .com after it either. But if you go to it you may have to go to the archive that will show all my post because they dont all fit on the page. And some of the more recent ones arent really medical related though
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Nice one :-D . I'll be sure to have a read when I get a spare 10 mins.
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Hopefully you will find some spare time then
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