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Hello. I'm 24 year old mother and I'm pretty worried for my son. Two years ago I got a beautiful little boy and my husband and I were thrilled about it.
I was skinny for almost all my life and I didn’t expected that anything else will be with my kids. My son is now almost two years but he is really skinny and maybe too tall for his age. I have never considered this to be some threat to his health but, it seams that I was wrong. My husband’s friend told us that he has greater chance to develop some heart disease then the other kids, for instance the fat one.
Can someone explain me this!

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I can't believe- what a coincidence!!! Someone told me the exact thing few weeks ago and I couldn’t believe!
In the meanwhile I was searching for the answer and listen now what I have found out. For many years it was considered that being healthy is being thin, but, some recent studies on kids showed that fattest children in the school will harder develop heart disease then the extremely fat one. Supposedly, if I understood correctly, skinny kids are born with fewer muscles then the normal and later in life, they are storing only fat, not muscles. That is causing damage to the heart!
None of this is really medically and scientifically proven so you have nothing to be worried. When your son enters some serious age- encourage him to engage in some sport activities!
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Weight status is only ONE risk factor for heart disease. I'm sure if your son gets plenty of exercise, eats right, doesn't smoke, and makes other smart choices concerning his health he will do just fine. Even if heart disease does run in your family.
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The friend may be referring to a condition known as Marfan's Syndrome which can have affects in the heart. In Marfan's syndrome one of the characteristics is an abnormally tall, thin stature with long fingers, loose joints etc. This is an inherited connective tissue disorder and can also affect the connective tissue in some of the heart valves and tissue. People diagnosed with marfans syndrome generally need to have regular echocardiograms to ensure that their aorta is not dilated and that their mitral valve is not prolapsing ("floppy").
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