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People who are tone deaf - those who truly cannot hear or produce musical tones - are actually processing the sounds differently in their brains, new researches showed.
Some scientists had thought that the problem lies in the part of the brain that first interprets sound, the auditory cortex, but The Annals of Neurology study suggests other brain areas are at fault.
The researchers were using an EEG to measure brain activity and they could instantly detect an abnormal response when a tone-deaf person heard a note.
For the study, 8 tone-deaf adults and 10 others were connected to an EEG and asked to listen to a series of musical tones. Half the time, one of the notes was pitched up or down. The volunteers were asked to say when they heard a change.
The study found that the brains of amusic volunteers did not respond to small changes in pitch that caused changes among the other volunteers but overreacted when the pitch changes were bigger.
Even though we often accuse one another of being tone deaf and incapable of holding a tune, most of us have got pretty good capabilities of distinguishing notes. People who have true amusia are actually quite hard to find.
The researchers are now working on to narrow down where in the brain the problem was taking place.

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Am i tone deaf?....I think so, im 15, and my voice sounds diffrent when said they heard, for example im saying something, of course i can hear my self, but then if i hear like a sound recording or on a telephone or sound way diffrent that i did.....K.....Even when i tr to sing, i sound diffrently in my head than i do outside.
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