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Hi,

I am seriously considering getting tested for MTHFR mutations. I have PCOS and suffer from insomnia, and someone in my family suggested to me that an MTHFR mutation might be to blame and that I should get tested. I have been reading quite a lot since then and it does sound possible. I definitely want to get tested. The only question is where?

I would like to get an MTHFR test as cheaply as possible, and with quick results. Where would you advise me to have it done? If any of you have been tested for this gene mutation, I would really appreciate you sharing your experiences of how it went and how happy you were with the service.

TIA

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Hi Abby,

I am considering getting the MTHFR test as well at the moment. I'm still in the research phase, but it's my understanding that:

* You can have it done for $199 through 23 and me. 

* One website called My Home MTHFR charges $150.

* It costs $199 through Molecular Testing Labs as well. 

There are many more options around. Some of the options require a physician to order the test while you can get it over and done with using home testing kits with others. All in all, you can expect to pay somewhere between $140 and $200. 

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I think the very best option for MTHFR testing is to have it done through your healthcare provider. Why? Several reasons. Everyone's talking about MTHFR right now, and some are spreading misinformation that gives you the impression that your health is at risk in ways it most likely isn't. You should only have an MTHFR test done if your doctor agrees that it is beneficial or necessary. Secondly, going through your doctor ensures quick results — and the testing may well be covered by your insurance, since a doctor has sanctioned it and deemed it medically necessary. That is my take on it, anyway. 

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While I agree with the suggestion to have MTHFR testing done through your doctor, I also understand that it's really not covered by insurance in most cases, not in the US at least. That is because, though insurance companies do recognize that there's a correlation between MTHFR mutations and certain health conditions, they still see the testing as experimental and therefore won't cover it.

If I really wanted a test, I think I'd go with 23 and me, for the simple reason that the fee actually includes extensive testing and not just testing for MTHFR mutations, for the same fee other companies charge for just the MTHFR test. That sounds like a pretty good deal to me.

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I actually thought that 23&me didn't interpret the results, as in, there's no separate processing that looks at whether you have an MTHFR mutation? So, if you want to know more about that, you'll either have to mess around trying to interpret the results yourself, which is hard, or you'd have to pay someone to analyze your 23&me results for you. There's services dedicated to this, even... and I don't remember what they're called now but I think this costs around $40 extra. That's not to say that 23&me isn't a good option, but you won't get comprehensive results right away or anything!

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Hi OP,

I understand from your post that:

1. Your PCOS is the reason you want to get tested for MTHFR mutations. 

2. You have not spoken to any medical professional about this and are solely wanting to do this because a relative recommended it to you and you then read about it on the internet. 

3. You want to get home testing for MTHFR mutations without a doctor's involvement. 

As far as point 1 goes, there was a study that found a link between MTHFR mutations and PCOS. The authors say:

"Although not statistically significant, there is a slightly higher prevalence of heterozygous (CT) genotype in women with PCOS. MTHFR C677T polymorphism when present may confer an increased susceptibility to develop hyperlipidemia in women with PCOS."

They conclude that not enough is known about this and more studies are needed. While there is nothing wrong with getting tested for MTHFR, as such, out of curiosity, please don't think you will find all the answers there. And please, talk to your doctor. MTHFR testing is indeed cheaper that way, and more than that, you can get an informed opinion as to whether you really need the MTHFR test. This would be my advice.

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Hi again and thanks to all for responding!!!

The last person is right that I haven't talked with my doctor about this. In fact, I've not been impressed with the care I've gotten for my PCOS at all and whenever I see him, he doesn't really seem to listen to me and dismisses my concerns as just hormones, including the insomnia. The insomnia is more recent and it's really interfering with my daily functioning. But nope, no helpful advice there. 

So yes, I'd like to do this through the internet if possible, and then afterward, I can eventually present the results to my doctor to make him see a possible cause that he'd just dismiss out of hand otherwise. 

Thanks for the suggestions on where to get tested. Does anyone know how long 23 and me takes to send results in? What about the others?

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Hugs to you, and please — look for another primary care provider if you feel your current one is not taking you seriously. Many of us have had to do so at one point or another and have found things got so much better with a different doctor.

23 and me test results take six to eight weeks to reach you, according to them. Molecular Testing Labs are quicker, at one to two weeks. I understand that you want the results as soon as possible, but perhaps 23 and me offers more comprehensive insights beyond the MTHFR mutation alone, that could also give you insights into your health?
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