Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

I was just informed that my unborn baby has 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome. I'll get to the point - I just have a little while to decide whether or not I wish to continue this pregnancy and I need to get all the information I can get my hands on. Can you tell me about autism factors and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome?

Loading...

Hi! I understand your concern. I'm not an expert but I did a small research and here are the information I found. 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome) is characterized by congenital cardiovascular disease, dysfunction of parathyroid gland, immunodeficiency, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Autism spectrum disorders as well as related Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and sometimes Obsessive Compulsive Disorder are common in children with the syndrome. Affected children show hypoparathyroidism and abnormal calcium homeostasis and, because of depressed cell-mediated immunity, serious bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Behavioral manifestations of this syndrome has been hypothesised to result in part from haploinsufficiency of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, located within the 22q11 region. Experts estimate that three to six children out of every 1,000 will have autism (some sources cite 1 out of 166 births). Males are four times more likely to be autistic than females; the reason for this has not been determined. Autism does seem to run in families, but it is not contagious. Twins are more likely than other relatives to share autism, and identical twins are extremely likely to share autism (though it may present quite differently in different children). There are no clear indications that children with food allergies, digestive issues, seizure disorders, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, speech apraxia or sensory integration dysfunction are more likely than other children to be autistic. There is, however, a large community of people who believe that one or more of these biological issues may lie at the root of some cases of autism. Certainly it is the case that autistic people are more likely than others to have these additional physical conditions. Some other possible risk factors for autism include: Advanced age of parents, Spontaneous genetic mutations with no known cause, Low birth weight and premature birth. I hope this will help you.
Reply

Loading...

My daughter has never been diagnosed with autism and she's 17, but the other symptoms sound familiar.
Reply

Loading...