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Hi, my sister is 34 years old and she was watching documentary about autistic children several days ago. She was very upset after that movie so she decided to get more info about behavior of autistic children. If someone has more information please shared it with me. Thank you very much.

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Hi, autistic child is very specific but in the same time there are many patterns of behavior which may be noticed at autistic child. These kids are very undependable; they are keeping their toys for themselves, they live in their own world and they may stare in one point for hours. They like to put their hand on ears and like to be on familiar places. They mainly don't speak.
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My history teacher has a son named Timmy who suffers from mild autism.I've known the boy for several years. Anyways, he is about 7 now and he can speak. Last year, he couldn't. He does share. Actually, a couple days ago he shared a piece of grass with me. He likes sameness, though. He doesn't stare at one point for hours.

I hope I helped!
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There is no specific behavior for an autistic child, just like there is no specific behavior for a neuro-typical child.



Some behaviors that are common in a child with autism maybe self stimulatory behavior/repeditive movements such as finger twisting, hand flapping, rocking, head banging, repeating of someone elses or their own words (echolalia).



Literal interpretation of phrases such as "he bit my head off"..."it's raining cats and dogs". May be confused by metaphors, similies, puns etc.



Prefers routine and can become upset or anxious with change in either routines, the place of household items/furniture etc.



May have obsessive interests (common in people with high functioning autism or Asperger Syndrome). May talk about their interest regardless of the other person is listening or not.



May make inappropriate comments/remarks because they are unaware of what is socially acceptable as can't read body language, facial expressions and tell what someone is feeling by tone of voice.



Depending on the level of function, people with autism may have an "odd" or peculair voice. May sound over formal, monotoneous or may not have any apparent voice "oddities".



There are more things that I have not mentioned but these are the most common behaviors seen in those with autism. Remember, it also depends how low or high fuctioning the person is. For example, those with LFA (Low functioning Autism) may be non-verbal, display a lot more repeditive behaviors, appear more "aloof" and so on. While those with HFA (High functioning Autism) or Asperger Syndrome may be verbal, but have voice peculiarities and/or slight speech delay, display less noticable repeditive movements and may be less "aloof".

Really, there is no "set behavior" and no people on the autistic spectrum have the same symptoms and severity of symptoms and there for wont display the same behavior.



Not all autistics are the stereotypical "head banging, non-verbal, meltdown prone" type. Some may be very intellegent and have a high IQ. Look at Albert Einstein, he was on the spectrum and was very intellegent.



Anyway...sorry for all of this information, it's a little too much but I hope it helps you to understand Autism.
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I have an autistic spectrum child and I don't find what you say is correct. I also have friends with autistic children, they are all quite different. An autistic child can take many years to learn to play with toys, are not attached to their toys, They are often very intelligent but are unable to communicate this, sometimes because they find speech hard, or they just can't verbalise, they are sometimes emotionally well below their age level but academically higher then age level. They have social skills depending on the severity of the autism, they are quirky and thats okay. To say they put their hands on their ears and stair into one point for hours is putting them into one mould and that is unfair. And shows you have not had experience with autistic children.
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