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Hello,

My dad is diagnosed with angina pectoris and was prescribed Atenolol. The medication worked well enough for his cardiologist to tell us he now considers his angina to be stable, since he was pain free for over half a year. Like I said, Atenolol was very effective, but at his latest appointment my dad’s cardiologist switched him from Atenolol to Nicorandil.

Since he also said that he’ll add Atenolol back to my dad’s therapy, I’m wondering how effective Nicorandil is compared to Atenolol. Is it common for these two medications to be used together?

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Health Ace
6885 posts

I wouldn't think it was unusual for his doctor to change meds. They seem to work differently on each individual.

I had bypass surgery years ago and came home with several prescriptions, all but one of them have been dropped over the years. I take Metoprolol as the main one but have had several as a secondary. We changed that one as recently as 6 months ago. It's kind of experimental to find out what works best for you and if you have any side effects you may not like.

The first one I discovered was making me short of breath when I went to bed so I made the doc change that. Next one left my mouth completely dry when I woke up in the morning, next one made me cough constantly, so tried a different one. I'm back to the dry mouth one now but I take it in the morning and have no problem with dry mouth.

So I think it's a matter of finding what works best for him and he needs to be proactive in the search so he is not uncomfortable because of what he's taking.

I feel it's my body and I get a say about what the doctor is going to do to it. If I don't like how something makes me feel we're going to discuss it.

 

 

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Hello, thank you for your reply! I agree with you that it's not uncommon for doctors to change medications, but what worried me was the fact that Atenolol seemed to work just fine with almost no side effects at all, and I was afraid that Nicorandil might start causing side effects or be less effective. The issue is not changing the medications and experimenting, but I just felt like it was unnecessary. Luckily, so far dad is doing OK on Nicorandil, no pain and no noticeable side effects so far. I did some more research as well and it seems that Atenolol and Nicorandil are fairly common combination for dealing with angina symptoms, so it looks like things should be fine.
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Hello,

like you said - it's fairly common for atenolol and Nicorandil to be prescribed for controlling angina pectoris symptoms. These two medications are from the same group, but they both work in a slightly different way.

My mom was first prescribed atenolol alone for her stable angina, but after her cardiac tests came in, her cardiologist added Nicorandil in order to better control her angina. So far, and it's been more than half a year, mom hasn't experienced much more side effects from the combination of these two medications, than when she was taking atenolol alone.

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