Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!


I have a friend who says she was always been sick to her stomach while riding in a car, train, airplane, or boat. I doubt she is telling me the truth, but anyway I would like to hear from you. Could you tell me is it possible to occur, because I have only heard for boat and seasickness. Can you tell me could she have car and airplane motion sickness, as she claims to me? I would appreciate any info about this topic because I really want to believe her.

Loading...


To understand motion sickness, it helps to understand a few parts of human body and how they affect the way that person feel movement. First, you have to understand inner ears, because the liquid in here sloshes around. This is helping to sense if person is moving, and which way person is moving, whether it is up, down, side-to-side, round and round, forward, or backward. Eyes are also important, because what you see also lets your body know whether you are moving and in which direction. Furthermore, you need to know there are also and skin receptors. These receptors tell the brain which parts of the body are touching the ground. Muscles and joint sensory receptors are the next, because these sensing receptors tell to the brain if someone is moving muscles and which position the body is. The brain gets an instant report from these different parts of the body and tries to put together a total picture about what person is doing just at that moment. However, if any of the pieces of this picture do not match, someone can get motion sickness. It is commonly happening as car and airplane motion sickness, so you should believe to your friend.
Reply

Loading...

I get carsick and planesick too, and I've never been in a boat long enough to know if I get seasick.
Reply

Loading...