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I have son, who is 20 years old, and he has exercise-induced asthma. That is what his doctor told us not so long time ago. He did not try to explain nothing more about this condition. That is why we are interested to found out a little bit more about this problem. What interest us the most are reasons why someone catches exercise-induced asthma?

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This is one of the most common conditions among active children and adolescents, so I am not surprised at all with your question. Usually, it happens with 90% of people with chronic asthma and round 40% of people who have allergic rhinitis. Exercise-induced asthma can also occur in healthy people who do not have chronic asthma. Exercise is the only stimulus for their asthma symptoms, which I believe is symptom your son experienced, since you did not mention he had asthma before. I have to disappoint you and say that pathophysiology of EIA is still unknown, but there are two main theories. First, that is water loss theory, who claims that loss of water from the epithelium of the bronchial mucosa dries the airway. Then, it is responsible for changing the osmolarity, pH, and temperature of the periciliary fluid. Hyperosmolarity of the airways is believed to cause mediator release and bronchoconstriction, and main problem with exercise-induced asthma. The second theory, which may account for why exercise-induced asthma, can occur after exercise is terminated. It is caused by increased ventilation during vigorous exercise cools the airways. I hope this could be enough for you to understand at least a little your son’s problem.
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