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I would like to try to deal with my stomach problems without applying antibiotics or some other “strong” medications. Well, I know they are not that strong, but they are not mild teat either. Anyway, I have heard that chamomile might be helpful with stomach issues. How soon will chamomile reduce my stomach troubles?

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Chamomile has been used as a remedy for a long time, it dates back in the period of Old Rome. It is known that it can handle some skin and stomach problems, menstrual issues too. Is it most commonly prepared in a form of tea and that’s how you should take it. Some even add peppermint, caraway seed, angelica etc for a better result. And the effect will come shortly after taking chamomile.
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Chamomile flowers are used in alternative medicine as an anodyne, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, nervine, stomachic, tonic, vasodilatory. The anti-inflammatory properties make it good for rheumatism, arthritis, and other painful swellings. Additional uses in herbal medicine include an antispasmodic for intestinal and menstrual cramps, relieving gas pains, and a very mild but efficient laxative. Milder tea in large doses is given throughout the day for fevers, sore throats, the aches and pains due to colds, flu, and allergies. External Use



An infusion of Chamomile flowers is used as a hair shampoo, especially for fair hair. The flowers are sometimes added to cosmetics as an anti-allergenic agent or made into a salve for use on hemorrhoids and wounds. The dried herb is made into potpourri and herb pillows, and is burned for aromatherapy. Applied externally as a wash or compress for skin inflammations, sunburn, burns, and added to bath for relaxing tired, achy muscles and feet, and softening the skin.



Other Uses



Chamomile tea is used as a liquid feed and plant tonic, effective against a number of plant diseases. An essential oil from the whole plant is used as a flavoring and in making perfume. The dried flowers are used as an insect repellent.

Constituents



The chief constituent of Chamaemelum have been identified as esters of angelic and tiglic, together with amyl and isobutyl alcohol's. It also contains anthemol and a hydrocarbon anthemene. The flowers contain various volatile oils including proazulenes. Upon steam distillation these proazulenes produce chamazulene, this is remarkably anti-allergenic and is useful in the treatment of asthma and hay fever.
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