Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Most people recognize potential health risks to the smoker and those exposed to second-hand smoke but what about the third-hand smoke?

Third-hand smoke contains contaminants of tobacco toxins after visible smoke dissipates. Researchers have shown a link between smoking in the home and persistently high levels of tobacco toxins long after the period of active smoking. These toxins take the form of particulate matter deposited in a layer onto every surface in loose household dust. These volatile toxic compounds off gas into the air over a period of days, weeks and months.

National Toxicology Program reported that particulate matter from tobacco smoke includes 250 poisonous gases, chemicals and metals. These are hydrogen cyanide (used in chemical weapons), carbon monoxide (found in car exhaust), butane (used in lighter fluid), ammonia (used in household cleaners), toluene (found in paint thinners), arsenic (used in pesticides), lead (formerly found in paint), chromium (used to make steel), cadmium (used to make batteries) and highly radioactive polonium-210 – to mention just a few. Out of these 250 poisonous compounds, 11 belong to a so-called Group 1 carcinogens, which are the most dangerous.

Whenever you smoke, toxic particulate matter from tobacco smoke gets into your hair and clothing and this way you are exposing your child to these toxins. When breastfeeding, these toxins transfer to your baby through your breast milk.

The researchers concluded that there is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke. Small children are the most susceptible to third-hand smoke exposure. They have faster respiration than adults and can inhale near, crawl and play on, or touch and mouth contaminated surfaces.
The researchers say that health messages about third-hand smoke contamination should be incorporated into current tobacco control campaigns, programs, and routine clinical practice. They are hoping that their findings will lead to a home smoking bans in the future.

For the time being, you can use the following inexpensive measures to resolve the residue problem: opening windows, air- filtering plants, using non-toxic cleaning products and a high-quality air purifier.

Loading...

This article contains very important information for smokers and non-smokers alike. Good job, Dennis.
Reply

Loading...

Thanks, I thought so too.

Do you believe that it is possible for the home smoking ban to be enforced EVER?
Reply

Loading...

Dennis this is a great article with good info.

One opinion I would like to add to these blogs...
I agree that cigarette smoke is unhealthy but so are alot of other things.
Should we not expose ourselves to household cleaners, air freshners, scents, soaps and other daily used household items that are filled with these chemicals also?
Where does it end?
Reply

Loading...

It ends with cigarette smoke. Household cleaners are harmful only when you intentionally sniff on it, much the same way that an addict sniffs on gasoline, paint thinner, or nail polish etc. You also have the choice of not using household cleaners, scented soap or air fresheners if you don't want to. The commercial products that you mentioned all have legitimate uses, whereas tobacco is merely a big money-maker for the tobacco industry, even though it causes hundreds of thousands of tobacco-related illnesses and deaths each year.
Reply

Loading...