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Hi, guys. I was diagnosed arrhythmia several days ago. I must admit that before this diagnosis, I had been accustomed to regular training and exercise. However, I am afraid I won’t be able to proceed in that way. How would exercise effect arrhythmia? I would really appreciate your opinions. Bye, guys.

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Hello, there. Well, as far as I know, exercises make your heart to pump the blood faster and stronger. If this happens with a person who already has arrhythmia, it can be dangerous. I think you should talk to your cardiologist. He will tell you what will be the best thing to do. My neighbor was diagnosed this as well and he had some restrictions in exercising. However, some mild exercises you will be allowed, I am sure. Physical activity is recommended for cardiovascular system. I hope I’ve helped. Please, let me know what you’ll find out. Bye!
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Hello :-D I definitely agree that you need to speak with your cardiologist. Arrhythmia is basically an irregular heartbeat... This can be completely normal & mean that you don't have to change anything at all. The important thing to understand is: not only what type of arrhythmia you have (arrhythmias can be either a faster heartbeat, a slower heartbeat, or even a heart beat that is just irregular, ie: skipping or extra beats), but you also need to understand WHY you have the arrhythmia. I was recently diagnosed with an arrhythmia as well, and when I spoke with my cardiologist, he was adamant that regular exercise was okay, and in fact encouraged, to strengthen my heart. What he did caution was to not take it too far (sometimes I would black out if I exercised too hard). I guess it's up to me to determine where that line is drawn! :-) Anyway, my point is that you may not have to alter anything, if you have been exercising for a long time, and you don't push yourself beyond your limits - but you definitely need to learn more about your specific condition.
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Here is a research about the positive effect of exercise in heart electrical stability by Horesh Dor-Haim:

Improved Cardiac Electrical Stability in Exercised Myocardial Infarct Rats with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

Authors:
H. Dor-Haim1, C. Lotan1, M. Horowitz1, M. Swissa2, 1Hadassah Hebrew University - Jerusalem - Israel, 2Kaplan Medical Center - Rehovot - Israel,
Topic(s):
Mechanism (Basic Science in Arrhythmias)
Citation:
Europace Journal ( 2009 ) 11 ( S6 ), Abstract 185

Background: Aerobic training reduces the occurrence of sudden cardiac death, in patients with CHD. We hypothesized that prolonged training will alter heart substrate for arrhythmia, thus increase electrophysiological stability in myocardial infarct (MI) heart model.

Methods: Adult rats (n=30) were studied for 8 weeks. The first group (n=6) underwent LAD ligation to form MI and then trained on a treadmill for 8 weeks (TMI). A second intact group (n=8) was trained, as well, for 8 weeks (ITT). A third group (n=8) underwent LAD ligation was investigated under sedentary conditions (SMI) and a forth sham operated group (n=16) was served as sedentary control (SCN). Eventually, EPS study was performed on the isolated Langendorff perfusion-system.

Results: TMI Isolated trained hearts showed 3-fold improvement in their tolerance to the induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in comparison to SMI. ITT, TMI and SMI hearts were significantly hypertrophied compared to SCN (15%, 18% and 20% increase respectively P<0.01). Effective refractory period (ERP) was significantly longer in SMI (39% increase p<0.001), however was normal in TMI. Aerobic training has also improved in vivo stress test measurements and ECG parameters (QTC and HRV) of TMI in comparison to SMI.

Conclusion: This study demonstrates the electrophysiological protective effect of aerobic training on MI heart model. Training has normalized the MI adverse effect on cardiac electrophysiology, despite ventricular hyperthrophy and structural remodeling of the heart. The improvement may be related to enhanced cardiac conductance and improved refractoriness induced by aerobic training.
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Hi All,
Sorry for showing up in between but I also have some kind of weird feeling (Tingling feeling at arms & legs, and feel like getting fainted but not fainted yet) after doing exercise (5-10 min after doing exercise). I don't know weather it is arrhythmia or not. I have 2D-Echo & stress test done on me and all came up normal.
The problem started suddenly 1 day when I was doing exercise as that day I exercised a little extra,and after 5-7 mins after exercise, I started feeling lightheaded and feel like getting fainted and also have tingling feeling in my arms,legs,stomach & left part of my chest for about 20 mins and after that these feeling go away slowly. I have high anti thyroid antibody,I don't know  whether this is related to my problem or not, please give suggestions as I am really confused that what is happening to me as I was doing exercise for the past 6 years and never had such a problem before, and now I can not continue with my exercise routine anymore.
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Treating arrhythmia the standard way (drugs + operations) can be pretty expensive. Of course, in some cases this is the only cure, but in other cases arrhythmia can be cured and can ONLY be cured by following a certain diet. But you have go through some tests first to see if your arrhythmia is caused by a physical flaw in your heart or from other factors (stress, bad nutrition, etc.). How do I know it works? I'm a living example! None of three different drugs doctors prescribed had any effect on me, but the change of diet did.  ***this post is edited by moderator *** *** web addresses not allowed***

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See a cardiologist who specializes in Arrhythmia disorders ASAP!
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Seeing an Electrophysiologist along with a Cardiologist is a good fit for anyone with a arrythymia disorder - I am going through this right now as well.  In a couple of days I am going through a Catheter Ablation to slow down my fast heartrate as medications and exercise have not worked with me to slow it down as well as the diet maybe because I am a Celiac?  I will post back with results on how I feel after the ablation with my heart and how it affects my body and my daily living.

 

I went through a couple of Cardiologist's before I found the one that was the right fit for me and willing to try to find the answer while consulting with the Electrophysiologist.  Make sure to ask for a 2nd opinion, it's OK and your right as a patient.  Also, as much as you are able to, keep up your exercise it is sooo important for your heart and health keeping it at a manageable level.

 

Good luck all!

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Hello friends!

I am 27. It was in October of 2011 that I started feeling a 'skipped heart beet' feeling. Gradually, within a month, it magnified and got to the proportion of Sinus Arythmia (after a Holter Monitoring). I then started taking anti arthymic medications and was getting back on track gradually after 3 months. Then, I discontinued the Med. after Doctors suggestions as these medication have a long term side effect on your body. But, soon within a year, the heart beat were fluctuating (slow-45, high-130), skipping and fluttering. I again went to the Best Electro.Doc. in Delhi. I was then suggested to undergo Ablation. I was petrified, even with the thought of it. I did not tell my parents or anybody of this finding. The condition became so worse that, I was breathless even on walking some steps, leave aside climbing stairs. I thought that I was about to die. But I had trust in myself and beleived that I could not die as I still had Purpose to my life. I than gradually, started with some Yoga postures along with mild walk. I must confess that it took me immense amount of perseverance and faith in myself and the formless God. Then, the next month I started walking on treadmill and now I run for 2 miles. From a condition where I could not have even walked I can now run miles. The Arterial flutterence and arythmias are all gone. 

P.S: I have read all the stuf on blogs, and some people do have actual solutions to the heart condition. But, rarely did I see somebody geting completely rid of this condition.

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Hello, I'm a 31 year old mother of a 2 year old. I started having high blood pressure and palpitations the last few weeks of my pregnancy and was put on blood pressure medication. I thought my anxiety issues caused my blood pressure to remain high since after my daughter was born I was still on medication for the next 9 months until I was able to wean off my blood pressure went back to normal but I began having palpitations out of nowhere. I was referred to a cardiologist and did the holter monitor and was diagnosed with psvt. I was put on a beta blocker- metroprolol tartrate.. Eventually my heart rate normalized and I was able to wean off the medicine.. Then about a year later I began feeling the fluttering skipped beats feelings and went back to my Doctor and he put me back on the medicine.. Since then I've been fine but still got palpitations from time to time a long with some shortness of breath and began feeling slight chest pains.. Since being on this medication I tried to wean myself off but my condition worsens so my doctor says I need to keep taking it.. I've done the stress test also and it just showed my heart takes time to go back to a normal heart rate after working out.. My doctor will not tell me much just relates a lot of my symptoms to my anxiety which is frustrating.. I don't feel any better now wth this medicine and I am desperate to try anything other than medicine to see if my heart can regulate itself again.. I've tried yoga but am not consistent with it.. Reading your post gave me some hope.. Are u still controlled without the medication? Or are u still dealing with this condition.
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