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Hi I am 54 years old male and I have troubles with my fast heart rate. When I am practicing my heart rate goes to 145 per minute and I feel pretty bad. I went to see my doctor and he sends me on treadmill with ultra sound. After that he told me that I have SVT supra ventricular tachycardia and prescribed me some medication. I would like to know if it is dangerous to continue with exercising.

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Hi, I have very similar problem like you and I also have same dilemma. I went to see my doctor and hear his opinion about my intention to continue with exercising. He told me that it would be good to moderate my exercises to keep my heart rate below 120 per minute but I would continue to exercise because it is very important for my general health.
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I disagree. I've have had SVT's for over 17 years. I exercise hard for 2 hours a day and I've never had a sustained high heart rate due to exercise. I have a theory that cardio exercise will reduce the amount of SVT's one has because the heart is more capable of shocking itself back to normal rhythm during an episode because it's stronger. When I get lazy and stop exercising I have significantly more episodes. I also raise my heart rate high during exercise (I do running, eliptical, pilates machine, boxing) and it comes back down afterwards no problem. I take no meds because that would paralyze the body so I either self-cardiovert or go to the ER for adenisine.
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I think it really depends on the severity of the SVT. The previous poster seems to have infrequent palpitations. In my experience, even tiny things like going up the stairs, temperature changes, or waking up too quickly could send me into hours if not days of an episode. Each person's SVT is different.

I have had SVT for 12 years now and had to drop every sport I was involved in. Though my body could handle it, the episodes kicked in more frequently when I was highly active (running and jumping) to the point that blackouts occurred. After many years of trying to find the right exercise for me, I noticed that high impact aerobics, like the sports I had been involved in, caused an episode almost immediately. Cycling, elliptical, yoga, some forms of dance, and most forms of anaerobic exercise seemed to be just fine. My heart rate would climb appropriately without episode.

Now, my SVT is severe enough that it warrants surgery, but your's might not be as bad. I would suggest trying things out, comb the internet for advice, as you seem to be doing, try different exercises that seem interesting, and find what feels right for you. Every body is different.
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Hi i had had svt since childhood at 21 i started to pass out when ever i had an attack ,i could still exercise but just had to be careful i had surgery at age 32 they took 80% of it away but left 20% behind i have been fine for 9 yrs but in the last 2 mths i have had a couple of twinges so i am back under the doctor so my advice would be as a suffer of svt you your self know how hard you push yourself so just be careful of take it slower .
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I've had SVT for 4 years. The cardiologists told me moderate exercise but no lifting more than 10 lbs. I do everyday chores and lifting, shovel snow with frequent rests and take long hikes and don't have attacks, those were caused by caffeine or stress. I think it is important to get  as much exercise as you can tolerate and ask your cardiologist about lifting. I agree that everyone has different triggers for episodes of SVT and while some people disagree with taking medication, it has helped me immensely.
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I am 58 with the same problem. Can you lift and run?

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I have only recently been diagnosed with SVT, atrial fibrillation/flutter (depending on which doctor you talk to), ventricular tachycardia, mitral valve regurgitation, and hypertension.  (Whew!)  I am 57 and quite active.  I exercise by running, training in the martial arts, kettlebell workouts, Pilates, stability ball, and yoga.  (Whew again!)  I happened to visit my doctor yesterday and asked him at what level I should be exercising, like, what should my highest heart rate be during exercise.  He told me that what I was doing was fine.  My heart rate generally doesn't go above 160, and is most often in the 145-155 range at the peak of my workouts.  My previous doctor told me I would have to stop exercising like I do, and his first course of treatment was ablation.  Uh, that's why I'm not with him anymore.  Some have mentioned and I agree, that everyone's situation is different.  Trust your doctor's advice, and if you don't, then find another doctor immediately! 

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P.S.  I workout with a 20-pound kettlebell, or two 15-pound kettlebells, depending on the dvd I'm using.

 

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I am 29 and have had svt episodes since I was about 10. As I've grown up my episodes have changed. They used to last 30-60 minutes now under 5 minutes but feel like a tidal wave and dizziness occurs. I recently tried doing some major cardio workouts (I workout all the time in fat burner mode not cardio) and I've been experiencing a lot of chest pressure and tightness in my throat. I have a resting heart rate between 50-60 bpm and have usually no issues while working out (outside of the chest and throat) but it is when I rest and just sitting that I seem to have more episodes lately. Mine are short 1 minute spells now but I used to go well over 200 bpm as a kid so I can feel it is that type of spike. Does anyone else find cardio kind of induces more episodes at rest?

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My doctor says to keep my rate no higher than 150. I am on medication for SVT also. My doctor welcomes exercise. 135 is a good fat burning anyway.
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Excercise is always best to stay healthy. But it should me in limit. There is no problem to start exercise.
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I have something similiar, just that mine tach appears after recovery… After some workout, when my heart rate drops back to normal lets say 80BPM, I sometimes feel tachycardia. Episode last for few minutes (It's better now, few years ago it lasted for hours).
I can run/cycle if my heart beats normally but if it’s in psvt it goes up to 200 in minutes… My normal HR is below 50...
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If I don't do regular exercise and am working hard and have stress from overwork or trying to do too many things at once, my SVT episodes can start and I can have one every 3 days where I cannot stop with Adenosine infections at the hospital, whereas if I swim every day at 12 noon using a front-mounted snorkel and a pull-buoy so I'm just using arms only, and keeping my pulse below 150 and letting it slow to 90 every 5 minutes of swimming, the SVT episodes do not occur. After having an episode every 3rd day for 3 months, I started swimming every day and have not had one for 5 months.

My resting heart rate in 4 months dropped from 68 to 56, and my heart-beat is stronger and extremely uniform.

l think even if I stop swimming the SVT will not start again as the myocardial muscles are stronger and able to prevent short-circuits from starting and, if they do start, the stronger muscles are able to re-configure the short-circuiting electric circuits back to normal.
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My sis had 2 episodes of svt with faintness n no blood pressure.. Can sumone tell weather it's advisable to go for surgery in winters or it c An be treated with excersise .. She is 40yrs old
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