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Hello,

My day was hospitalized for the third time since February and this time his GI doctor gathered the whole family and simply told us that survival rates for this far gone liver cirrhosis are very low, practically he told us to prepare for the worst. Dad was a heavy drinker for at least 20 years, but he stopped after he was diagnosed with alcoholic fatty liver. But even though he stopped drinking, the disease continued to progress. I’ve read very different opinions on how big are the chances for him to recover and if anyone has been in similar situation any info will be greatly appreciated. We’re just too scared and don’t know what to expect.

Emily

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Hi Emily,

Your father's doctor knows him and his case better than anyone anywhere.  Is it possible that he can recover, yes.  Is it likely, no.

I'm not trying to sound negative but listen to HIS doctor.  Short of a transplant, which may or may not be possible depending upon other factors, his prognosis is not good.

We can always hope for the best.

My best for his recovery.  Sorry to be so "blunt.

 

 

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Thank you for your reply. I appreciate your honesty, and even though it made me cry, it helped me to come to terms that dad won't be with us for much longer. Since dad is almost 70 and his health overall was ruined by alcohol his doctor didn't even mention transplant as an option - I assume because dad wouldn't qualify anyway. Thank you again, I'll try to keep you updated on how he's doing.
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Unfortunately, patients that have contributing factors such as alcoholism, are not considered candidates for transplants , and other reasons such as age and viability of surviving the surgery . Transplants also require many drugs that are taken for the rest of their life, to help the body from rejecting a transplanted organ into a body it did not com from. While this disease is strongly related to drinking, some get it who have never drank a drop of alcohol in their life.. My Grandmother, A good southern Baptist, who never drank, had cirrhosis of the liver. Some times it is a slowly progressing disease, but if not found until the latter stages is usually fatal. The disease, from my understanding, slowly hardens the Liver ,until it gets to the point it can no longer to perform its function. Loosing anyone you love, is always hard. I lost my father when he was 57, after triple by-pass surgery. Depending on your religious beliefs, you may take comfort that they are no longer in pain and suffering, and are in a better place. The biggest part of grief is the fact that we no longer have that person that we love. It is a selfish feeling, but in reality, it is because it will leave a void in our lives that cannot be filled. The best thing to do, with the time you have left is to gather friends family, and photos and memento's of their life. Talk to them and help them and yourselves to remember the good parts of your life that you want to remember them by. Hang or place pictures of them at home of them when they were healthy and you had pleasant recollections of their life. Not the last pictures that were taken of them as the aged. Grieving is one of the hardest things to get through in your life. Months later you will be in a store shopping , see something, and think Dad would love that. Forgetting at that moment that he is gone, and you thought of things that would make him happy. If he had a favorite flower, plant one in your flower bed, I have a painting of a bowl od gooseberries, because there was a gooseberry bush in the backyard of their house, next to the sage bush. I have a painting of a single yellow rose, many years old, but something that is above my desk that I see everyday. Get rid of clothing and items that are no longer of use to you and give them to a charity, perhaps the veterans, that are always in need of items. It will take time , but you have to work through it, not for yourself, but for the others that depend on you and look to you for support. Best of luck inn this time of need.
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