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I know my son had bad luck to get this rare disease but there is nothing I can do now. He present with a limp and local tenderness of the medial aspect of the foot over the navicular. He can walk with increased weight on the lateral side of the foot. Also swelling and redness of soft tissues is frequent. His doctor diagnosed him with Freiberg’s syndrome, so I would like to know more about this disease.

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Typical patient for Freiberg’s syndrome is a boy, but sometimes it can happen to a girl. Usually children are around 5 years old. They complain of pain in the foot over the apex of the longitudinal arch. They walk with a limp and tend to walk on the outer body of the foot. Freiberg’s syndrome is very rare disease, also has been called and osteochondritis of the metatarsal head, usually the second Freiberg’s infraction. Then it has been called as Kohler’s second disease, second metatarsal osteochondritis, and Freiberg-Kohler syndrome. That is a condition, where the navicular bone in the foot undergoes avascular necrosis. Avascular necrosis is a disease resulting from the temporary or permanent loss of the blood supply to patient’s bones. Without blood, the bone tissue dies and causes affected bone to collapse. For some unknown reason, and typically happens with a child, the navicular bone in the foot loses its blood supply for a while. What you can do is to help an overweight child lose weight and encourage him to exercise moderately, avoiding extremes, and do not ever ignore his pain.
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hey my name is natasha and I am 16. I have frieburgs syndrome. what was the operation called that you can get to help im in a lot of pain and at the minute i can hardly walk. Do you have any information on freiberg syndrome that you could tell me cause i dont know a lot about it cause the doctors have just realised that i have this syndrome.

please write back tashaxx
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Hi, im 18 now and I was diagnosed with freibergs a year ago now and nothing has seemed to get any better. Four months after I was diagnosed with it the doctors also found that I had a stress fracture in my left foot which has caused even more problems in my foot with nerve damage. Over the last year I have been going to a private hospital getting treatments for the pain and to help me walk again, I have been using crutches. I have found that acupuncture has been helping me with the pain a bit more as it makes me less tense with the pain. Im also having physiotherapy, pain management and using a Tens machine. The last option if my pain management plan does not work is to get an operation to have the metatarsel heads removed from my feet.
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Hi ya

I was diagnosed woth Feibergs syndrome last year - about 10 years after I kicked the end of my bed by accident (being a man I just thought it would go away eventually) I always had pain and discomfort (particularly after running). Last year it got so bad I couldn't walk. I went to a podiatrist who diagnosed the problem. I wear orthotics now and the pain is manageable. I was able to get the pain under control again after about 6 weeks. I can still run but I've been told to accept it will never get that much better. I also went to see a consultant ortho surgeon - who described a procedure to replace the heads of the joint bones - equivalent of a mini knee replacement but the procedure and recovery sound pretty severe and I would be advised not to run again afterwards so 'm sticking to the orthotics
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I was diagnosed with Freibergs when I was 12 or 13 (I'm 28 now). I have it in both feet. I never had a specific injury or trauma, but I was very active in sports from the time I was 6 years old. I also began taking steroids for a kidney disease starting around age 11. I believe that the combination of these two factors contributed to the Freibergs. I stayed active through my teens and just kept icing my feet. I also got Cortisone injections, but that didn't really help. Finally when I was 21 I decided to get the metatarsals taken out and had artificial ones put in. The pain is less, but I have a much smaller range of motion. I can only bend my toes about 40% of normal range. This would be a burden if I was a dancer or professional athlete, but I've learned to adapt and it doesn't really affect my day to day life that much. I am glad I'm out of pain so I guess the surgery was worth it.
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My daughter is 13 (Rachael) and was diagnosed with Freibergs. She thinks the diagnosis is wrong because the pain is more in the back of her foot. She is very active in sports too. Before Freibergs I took her to a pediatric podiatris who had diagnosed her with post tiberal tendonitis and she had a boot on for two weeks, went to physical therapy and was no better. I am looking into bringing her to Cleveland Clinic in Ft. Lauderdale because I don't know what to do anymore. She still has pain, her hip hurts now too. Does this sound like any of the issues anyone else had?
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