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I have been diagnosed with iliotibial band-friction syndrome few months ago. I have noticed I need help when I could not stand any more this pain in my legs. I have been to the doctor who told me just to rest enough. However, I have heard there could happen that some anatomic factors are associated with this problem. Then I started to be worried if that might happen to me, and do I need better treatment for iliotibial band-fraction syndrome, so can you give me an answer to this.

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It is true there are some anatomic factors that are associated with this problem called iliotibial band-fraction syndrome. Those factors are hip abduction contracture, genu varum, heel and foot pronation, tight heel cords, and internal tibial torsion. However, if your doctor did not diagnose you must have isolated ilieotibial band-fraction syndrome. For this problem, required treatment is rest, ice, and stretching of iliotibial band. Your doctor should give you instructions to avoid hills, shorten stride, and run on alternate sides of road. You could also try with anti-inflammatory medicines, orthotics, ultrasound, and contrast baths together with local steroid injection. There are two different stretching approaches treatments for ilieotibial band-fraction syndrome. Those treatments are self-stretching and stretching with an outside-applied force. I could tell you there is no need to be worried because probably your doctor prescribed to you what he found as the best way to treat this condition. You could only try to help yourself with self-stretching, but I would recommend you to ask your doctor about instructions.
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naumann wrote:


It is true there are some anatomic factors that are associated with this problem called iliotibial band-fraction syndrome. Those factors are hip abduction contracture, genu varum, heel and foot pronation, tight heel cords, and internal tibial torsion. However, if your doctor did not diagnose you must have isolated ilieotibial band-fraction syndrome. For this problem, required treatment is rest, ice, and stretching of iliotibial band. Your doctor should give you instructions to avoid hills, shorten stride, and run on alternate sides of road. You could also try with anti-inflammatory medicines, orthotics, ultrasound, and contrast baths together with local steroid injection. There are two different stretching approaches treatments for ilieotibial band-fraction syndrome. Those treatments are self-stretching and stretching with an outside-applied force. I could tell you there is no need to be worried because probably your doctor prescribed to you what he found as the best way to treat this condition. You could only try to help yourself with self-stretching, but I would recommend you to ask your doctor about instructions.

This syndrome is very easy to treat and cure. No meds are necessary. I ( a massage therapist ) have treated many people with this problem and have dissolved this problem by assessing their ROM ( range of motion ) of the hip and leg and treating with massage / stretching / strengthening. Seek out a sports massage therapist for help with this problem. rwhynot.ca

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I have problems with my illiotibial, and also suspect some Posterior Tibial Tendon Problems, as I tore off a ligament in the foot some years ago. I use soles in my shoes, as the arch is practically non existent. Lots of pain in foot and in the leg and lower back. The illiotibial affects the L5 as I have found it.

I also have a neck damage, some ligaments there (tough luck - I know) and some TMD in the jaw due to this. All on right side.

What I am wondering is: Wich muscles affects which..? Is there a connection where do I start treatment. Obviously I also have a bite - thingie and get treatment for the whiplash, but am I missing something?
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