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so I was told tonight that I have wobbly form. How worried about this should I be? The person who mentioned my form noticed my "unique" running style. My knee was twisted when I was born and it took years of dance to get my form correct...that's what started me in ballet in the first place. He said I'm what he thinks is a superpronator???? huh? and maybe should consider orthotics to be balanced....for my running form.

Man, I want to be a better runner, but running form...how important is this? :|

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The big question for me to you, Shelley, is - are you comfortable when you run? Have you noticed any pain, etc., when you've tried to experiment with different speeds, strides, and so on?

You know I am no expert when it comes to this stuff. But it's what you probably are thinking - no two people have the same form. What works for you won't work for me. If people all had the same build, then maybe there's a standard. If what you do is comfortable to you, there's no need to change.

When we ran at Crazy Legs, I didn't notice any 'wobbly form' to your running. Granted, there were thousands of people to deal with, but I think I stuck close enough where I would have noticed something unusual. And I didn't.

:)
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Don't mess with it unless it is causing you problems. You can try to improve some things from the waist up, or do a few form drills, but you really don't want to force anything that is uncomfortable. This will usually cause more problems than it fixes.

For what it is worth (everyone is different), I have the worst looking form of any runner I've ever seen. I have adapted to it over years of training, however, and now I'm extremely efficient at it and manage to move along pretty good.
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By the time you reach your teens and later, your body movements and the way you run have been established and RADICAL changes are more likely to damage rather than do any good.
Over that period your body will have compensated for the imbalances in motion and strength with any sort of luck.
Orthontics MAY be the answer to "wobbly form" but it could be a dozen other things.
Retriever and Craig are right, if you are comfortable in running then stay with it. It dosen't have to be pretty, just functional.
That being said, the bulk of mishaps to runners, particularly those coming late into the sport, are the result of over-use asking the body to carry a greater load than it can cope with, so give some thought to strength, and or flexibility to support it.
Footfall or "superpronation", body posture, upper body strength, arm swing, co-ordination and rhythm needs specific attention through various drills to withstand the stresses encounted during your runs. Have an accredited coach check you out or at least some EXPERIENCED runners could probally give you some advice on the basis of what they see when you run, although a lot of their advise will be based on their own experiencees.
Some of it will apply to you, most of it won't.
YOU are the one that will have to work out what applies to you over time.
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The best analysis I ever had done was by a physical therapist runner I know that gave me a complete gait analysis. From there, I was able to get myself in the right shoes and understand the stride I had.

Just my 2-cents, but I hear more orthodic nightmares, than pleased customers. I really do think it is the modern day family doctors' cure-all for running ailments. Personally, I'd avoid getting on that high dollar and frustrating road. Again, just my experience, but there's umpteen solutions to try before draining your wallet on a 50/50 proposition.

And as others have said, "If it ain't broken, don't fix it." :)
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This is pretty much what I concluded. If my form isn't causing injury, I probably shouldn't do something that may cause me to be sidelined.
Thanks for the advise, everyone! :)
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