Couldn't find what you looking for?

TRY OUR SEARCH!

Everyone says that I should get a heart rate monitor but they don't give me a good reason.

How do they help? :-?

Loading...

They make you feel guilty if you don't run because you just spent a lot of money on something that really isn't necessary.

:shrug: I don't have one.
Reply

Loading...

They are very useful in helping you not overtrain and to keep a reasonable pace. If you run too much above your heart rate zone you will not be able to finish your run or you will be very fatigued. On the other hand if you run too slow you won't get the real benefits of your exercise.

Many old time and/or very experienced runners will tell you to let your body tell you how for and fast to run. For a lot of us, myself included, this is not wise. I have a very hard time controlling my pace on easy, tempo and long runs. The HRM helps me know when I'm running too hard. It also helps me finish my long runs in pretty good shape.

So keep in mind it is only a tool. It is not the wherewithal of running. If you are satisifed with your running and not having any problems on your distances, I would not advise an HRM.
Reply

Loading...

I agree with Garebelrunner. I found mine extremely useful--I have tendency to run too hard. Only cost me $40 at a discount store and no problems for nearly four years.
Reply

Loading...

Here's an article you might find helpful. I fought getting one. Very hard I fought. Katt recommended it, then TriBob "strongly urged" me to get one because I, too, tend to run too hard on any run less than ten miles. I must say - I've been using it for over 3 months and I've noticed improvement. My times are steadily coming down, I feel better during and after runs, and I'm running much better in the heat and humidity (aka unlike last summer, I don't feel like death). I hope those two don't see this. There will be hell to pay if they hear I said they were right about something.
Reply

Loading...

Too late Kid...SAW IT!

I am a firm believer in using a HR monitor, but concede not everyone needs to use it. As GRR said, it's a great tool to make sure you're doing your runs at the right intensity level. I used to run hard, every day, and couldn't figure out why my legs would get tired, my runs would get slower etc... Now I know that my recovery days are truly recovery days, and things have gotten much better.

Before investing in one, check out "Heart Monitor Training for the Compleat id**t" by John Parker. He does a great job explaining how and why to use one. (and complete is mispelled in the title)

Reply

Loading...

I'll admit to not using mine all the time. but i feel it is a great aide in my training. one yes keeps me from using subjective observations. that along with my Garmin is also great in a race to determine when proficiency is not equal to effort. it tells me to slow down a bit before "blowing a gasket"

now for speed work, fartlek, hills and such i don't use it. and if i go out to just enjoy myself, i wont use it at all.

since it's inception in my training in December i have noticed an improvement in my times both running and skating.
Reply

Loading...

Seemingly like everything in distance running, there's two schools of thought.

One, being a beginning, older runner, a HRM is a tool that'll help to avoid, as has been mentioned, fatigue, overtraining or "blowing a gasket". And rightly so, there are a good number of runners suseptible to these things and keeping tabs on your HR is useful.

But there is also the avenue to consider that you can learn to "read" your own body. If you are a youthful runner, I would encourage you to not go with the HRM, but to become an expert on what it takes to get your body to fatigue. Push yourself a time or two to the point of overtraining. Get out there and race to the point that you blow a gasket. This distance running pursuit is a life long study for you of your body. Until you redline and learn the real limits of how you can push yourself, you might just become a slave to a digital readout.

As you might guess, I'm a non-HRM runner and a self-proclaimed Caveman runner in keeping this is as simple as it needs to be. Some personalities are perfect fits to be running engineers, but I'm not and prefer the more intangible side of the sport. Running "by feel" is indeed a science all to it's own, but my innards tell me it's the best ticket for me, and for many, to be the best runner you can.

So there... not "everyone" is telling you to get one
Reply

Loading...

yeah but you ride a 'bent so what do you know?
i admit sometimes i feel like i am wired for sound, and not even a music player is on me. there is something to be said for just going.
Reply

Loading...

Which is exactly what an HRM teaches you to do.
Reply

Loading...