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Tell me about the ab workouts you do.

I have not incorporated any workouts that include my abs for years due to pain from my c-sections. Just recently I started using them and it's very painful (especially around my scar).

How many days per week are you working your abs out?
Is there a great benefit with your running by doing so?

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Well...I don't do much ab work at all. basically none. Although I do think about starting something about once every couple of weeks or so.
I'm not sure if "great benefit" will come from ab work. It will help your core, and that will help your form, and it will make you a more effecient runner. So, it will definately help, but I don't think it's a miracle pill.
:twocents:
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my abs are pitiful.

i have recently started a core program and it wasn't until now that i realize how weak they are; both my abs and my lower back are strength-less. my abdomen is as flat as it's ever been so i just assumed..... :umno: so, i'm doing core not just for running but for other postural problems as well. can't hurt in the long run either

um, jackedup has a nifty ab workout. i get the feeling abs and lower back need to be balanced though.
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I work out my abs 2-3X a week for the primary purpose of strengthening them (although I do have the 6-pack look now). Having a strong core is very important in distance running because that's where the central support for your upper body comes from when you run. If your core (back and abs) is weak, your running technique will suffer resulting in an inefficient running style, causing you to fatigue sooner and increasing the chance of injuries.
I do a variety of ab workouts (with the help of a strength coach/trainer). I do them with or without an exercise ball. Some examples include:
1) bridge-you are facing down on the mat on your elbows and toes, your body raised above the ground...hold that position for 30-60s, using your abs to support your body w/o curving your back
2) side bridge...same idea as the first one, only thing you are on your side...hold for 30-60s on each side...it's alot harder than the first one
3) Ball roll- prayer position (on elbows)- place elbows on exercise ball, toes on the ground... body position similar to the bridge...roll the ball away from you as far as you can with your elbows, using your abs to maintain your position , and roll back, repeat 8-15X

There are many more that I've done but I'm running out of time to describe them, some are variations on the same theme, others different...PM me if you are interested...
I've found that abwork (along with other strengthening exercises) has improved my posture not only in my running technique but also in everyday life (while sitting/standing/walking). I am able to climb hills more efficiently without my form breaking down too much. I haven't got injured in more than a year now since I started this stuff...Of course there are other factors that come into play, but core strengthening is something many runners neglect in their training.
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i don't mean to brag but....i have a highly defined 6 pack and i dont even work out

being fit rocks :P

:edit: wow since i changed my screenname on April 29 but kept the posts now it says i am posting 20 times a day.. :umno: ..2 is more like it
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ABSolutely!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! There is a price to pay if you ignor them completely.....but there is no benefit of carrying around a six-pack while running. If you ignor your abs and all your surrounding muscles become very strong from running quads, hamstrings.....etc (they all attach at your trunk), your trunk becomes unstable. I'm in physical therapy for this right now and my running has never been better (when I can run, that is).
I'd suggest pilates or yoga.
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I'm not sure what benefit to my running my ab workout does. I do crunches. 20 regular, 20 slow regular, on both right and lift sides - 20 oblique regular, 20 slow oblique, 30 full body crunches - 150 crunches 3 to 4 times a week. I get them in almost always after a long run (I've been told or read somewhere it helps with breathing eventually) and then after several short runs during the week.
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What will really help your running if you can find time (time, what's that?) is yoga. I don't think any exercise other than, of course consistant running, improved my pace more than yoga did. You learn to breath better and, of course, how to concentrate when there's a lot of pain.
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Improving your abs will help your running.

There is nothing bad that will come from it.
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I have abs???
Seriously, my abs are stronger than the average bear's even though I don't isolate them because I have good posture. I walk rib cage lifted, tummy pulled in (well as far as it pulls in ). This relieves the work your lower back does. I am especially conscious of this when running, because when I get fatigued I tend to droop over and then my breathing goes all to h*ll.
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Pilates. I've gotten out of the habit recently but I used to do it 2-3 X/week. Pilates is great for strengthening the core, and the stronger my core, the longer I can I seem to be able to hang in there on long runs.
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I'm sure people here will disagree, but I think that doing the other things like abs, light upper body weights, drinking lots of water, and regular stretching are the things that add up and make the difference for me being a 17:00 5k runner vs a 19:00 5k runner.
Those things help out after you have brought up your mileage and gotten comfortable with your speed workouts. But I do think they all help.
But what do I know?
ps - I do the ab workout the Jacked Up sent me.
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In general, you don't know c**p. But your assessment of ab work, upper body strength training, etc. is pretty accurate in my book.
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I will do abs and back on the same day.

For back, I lay down on my stomach, and then I pretend I am Superman, then I go fetal position for a few moments.

For abs, I spind around into a situp, but keep your legs straight, then down, then knees bent into a crunch, then repeat.

It sounds crazy, I know, but I am focused on race walking competitively.

Ramsey Carlson
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The biggest thing I've learned from the day after my half marathon (which is today) is that I need to incorporate some consistant core work before my marathon in the fall.

Right now my abs and lower back are almost as sore as my quads and calves.

I have never experienced this before with shorter distance races, so I have always been skeptical about the benefit of core strength for running.

Why do I always have to learn things the hard way?
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