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this was fine for the umpteen years of classical ballet, but not so great for running. While buying new shoes today, the owner of the runner store (would have bought them online but thought I needed to change brands) looked at the bottom of my Saucony Grids and said: Ohhh, no. Does your heal ever hit the ground?

I'm pushing off so hard that there is no tread infront of the toes, and in the pads there are deep toe indentations. I'm like: so what do I do about this? He's like: change the way you run. :? But this is how I run, apparently on my toes. :( Then, he mentioned another runner he knew who did this who had been training for a marathon and had to reschedule it 6 months later because the runner had to learn a different way to run.

So what if I run on my toes? Besides ugly toes, I don't see why I'd need to change the way my feet strike the ground.

Hey! I now am the proud owner of Adidas shoes!!! That's cool. No more sore ankles. :D

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If you do decide to change your gait, back off your mileage some and rebuild back up to where you are now.

I used to be a heavy hel striker and a friend recommended that I switch over to running with a more forefoot strike. I switched over to that method of running (and still run that way). But, because I overpronate so much, it put too much stress on my middle toes and I ended up with a stress fracture of the third metatarsal.
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While running form is a completely individual issue and no two runners should ever have identical form. There are basic mechanical principles that must be adhered to. If you mean that you run without ever permitting your heel to touch and rest on the ground, this is a form error of the highest magnitude. It puts terrific stress on the ball of your foot and toes and I suspect also your ankles. Eventually it is going to result in injuries. Correction is fairly simple. Once a week, on an easy run day, concentrate on your form and work on a more natural foot strike. The foot strike in running is just a speeded of version of the foot strike experienced with walking. No one walks on their toes because it's uncomfortable. Neither should one run on their toes. As youu walk, concentrate on how you ground your ankle and midsole, then push off with the ball of your foot and the toes. Incorportate that into your running form. Another good way to work on this is repetitions of running short distances (i.e. 100 meters) at a fast though not exhausting pace while you concentrate on your running form. It need not interfere with your current schedule or mileage.
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I used to be a heavy heel striker and a friend recommended that I switch over to running with a more forefoot strike. I switched over to that method of running (and still run that way). But, because I overpronate so much, it put too much stress on my middle toes and I ended up with a stress fracture of the third metatarsal.
What was the logic in recommending running with a more forefoot strike?
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To lessen th ebraking action that is caused by a hell strike. Read the 5th paragraph down
Other than giving me a stress fracture in my toes (which could have been avoided if I had back off and rebuilt my mileage), a more forward foot strike seems to have helped lessen a lot of the other aches and pains I was having while running.
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Both you and PH offer good advice. Today when I was fighting the wind and snow I decided I'd be slow anyway considering the conditions so started thinking about my form. The heal lightly grazes the ground, but most of teh impact is being taken in the arch and, yeah, toe (especially when I push off). I tried concentrating on getting my heal to make contact and push off, as you mentioned, from the ball of the foot. It felt so unatural. I know I'll have to work on this, though, like you said during shorter runs, or maybe the longer runs when I'm getting tired. Kind of depressing to learn something like this. :(
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Try not to be discouraged about it! Honestly we all have form flaws that we have to work on either to get better or to avoid injuries. I have some of my own. I focus on form twice a week, on recovery run days to improve in these areas. Just spend a little time concetrating on trying to land more midfoot than on your toes and the rest of the time just enjoy your running. From reading your posts it appears that you have accomplished a lot in your running already so you have a great deal more to be proud of than to be depressed about! Good luck with it! :D
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Foot strike....the key here is to avoid over striding. I think that a mid-foot strike directly under or slightly ahead of a runner's center of gravity is ideal. Most of us are heel strikers, which indicates that the foot strikes the ground somewhat ahead of our center of gravity, which has a braking effect. Generally, the harder the heel strike, the greater the braking action. Methods to detect and correct over striding that I use are to listen to my foot strike (the harder and louder the foot strike, the greater the over stride) and to "soften" my foot strike by imagining that I'm running on a breakable or harmful surface.
Interesting thought about running. Although, if one were to actually keep their foot strike directly under their center of gravity, there would be no forward movement. I understand what this author is trying to say, it's just that he/she isn't saying it properly. And it causes people like your friend to recommend this to people like you, who will unquestionly follow this poor advice, and get hurt.
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Not trying to start an argument, but I'm thinking that even if your foot strike (the point at which your foot is most forward) is directly under your center of gravity, you would still go forward, because the point you lift your foot is behind your center of gravity. I apologize if this seems too picky or I misunderstood your point.
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Not trying to start an argument, but I'm thinking that even if your foot strike (the point at which your foot is most forward) is directly under your center of gravity, you would still go forward, because the point you lift your foot is behind your center of gravity. I apologize if this seems too picky or I misunderstood your point.
Please, start an argument!
I think what that author is trying to say in his article is that one of the five things runners can work on, form-wise, is over-striding. He mentions this in the first sentence I quoted. Good advice, which needs to be followed. BUT...
My particular beef is with his following sentences and his definition of "center of gravity". If we actually place our feet beneath our COG, we would be standing still. Our COG is located in our pelvic region, midway between anterior and posterior. So, if we take a step forward (or backward for that matter) we have stepped out of our COG.
If you were to step forward with your right foot about one foot, your COG would then be on a plane with the midpoint between your two feet (in a forward-backward direction). Therefore, it is impossible to run with a foot strike within our COG.
Of course, our forward motion is really related to inertia and momentum of force anyway.
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