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I was recently diagnosed with non-insulin dependent diabetes and as probably many patients, after a period of anger and denial, decided to the responsible thing and follow my doctor’s instructions. I have recently been searching online for further information, especially regarding the complications and I came across a blog, describing the experience of a young diabetic patient who suffered diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). After reading the blog, this patient was started immediately on insulin, which I was not. His experience was quite horrifying and scared me a bit. Am I at risk of getting DKA? What causes DKA? Shall I start insulin to prevent DKA??? Thanks.

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I am not sure what your situation is but it sounds like maybe you are just watching your diet and exercising to control your diabetes?  Are you on any oral medications?  I can understand your anger and how frightening a new diagnosis is.  I can say that everyone's experience is different as well as their bodies.  The young patient may have had type 1 diabetes mellitus whereas you have type 2 diabetes mellitus.  People like the young patient you read about are highly likely to suffer from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).  You should be rest assured that you are much less likely to develop DKA.  Their diagnosis is different because their pancreas will not produce any insulin.  Type 2 diabetics have pancreas that secrete insulin but their bodies' cells may be insulin-resistant. 

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User avatar
Apprentice
34 posts

It appears as if you have type II diabetes and the person you are referring to has type I. The differene between the two is that in type I diabetes, patients produce no insulin and as you seggest, this may trigger ketoacidosis. On the other hand, patients with type II diabetes (the most common type of diabetes) produce insulin and usually more than healthy adults. The reason for type II diabetes is the resistance of tissues to the actions of insulin, rather that lack of insulin. In other words, insulin is there, just the body does not want to utilize it. Through complicated metabolic pathways in our body, however, presence of insulin blocks excessive formation of ketones from fatty acids, which are responsible for DKA. Follow your diet, exercise and stick to your treatment. You are unlikely to ever suffer from DKA. Best, Tom. 

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