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Does anyone out there have Rh- blood type and if so, have you had complications with your pregnancy? I had major complications with mine, and acually call my son a miracle baby! He is as healthy as a horse today though! :-D I am trying to get pregnant again but have read that the second pregnancy can be more dangerous than the first! If anyone out there has gone through a second pregnancy under these crecumstances and has had a good or bad outcome, please tell me your story! Thanx!

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Hi how are you? I actually was not as lucky as you with my first pregnancy. In fact he didn't make it, but i am very happy to report that I had two successful pregnancies after. Both of my sons were born healthy. I wish you luck and a very healthy baby.
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When you initially go in for your first prenatal check-up, your doctor should be doing blood tests to find out what your blood type is if not already known. If you are Rh negative, around 28 weeks gestation you will be required to receive an injection to keep your body from recognizing the Rh positive blood of your baby. You will receive another injection after you deliver your baby. I am O negative and I have had 2 healthy children with no complications from the Rh factor of myself or either of my children.
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I am Rh negative and I had no problems with my first pegnancy, though i gave a birth a month early to my healthy daughter. Couple years later I was pregnant again and miscarried in 8-10 weeks, another couple of years later I was pregnant again and again I miscarried in 6 weeks.
My doctor told me that she thinks I should have an anti d injection after miscarrage. Does anyone know if this is correct?
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I am rh neg to and I had my daughter with very little complications. I was put on birth control and soon miscarried probably due to timing with the BC. I was not told that I would need the shot and then miscarried six times each time getting further and further along. I finally was told by a doctor after my last miscarriage that I would need the shot. After that I got pregnant with my son and carried him full term while it was a tough pregnancy he was healthy.
I now know that you should always get the shot even if you miscarry and because I did not get that shot I have built up anitbodies.
I am trying to get pregnant now and having a rough time of it.
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hello, i am rh negative too,about 13 yrs ago i had a miscarriage b4 12 weeks, couple of mths later i had another miscarriage, again b4 12 weeks,after my 2nd miscarriage the doc called my hubby and myself in to explain that i would need an anti d needle and what this was 4,i am sorry this didn't happen after the 1st miscarriage, however the next year i carried to full term and 2 more full term babies after that, all healthy, so in answer to your question, yes have the needle
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im rh neg and had very few probs during my 1st pregnancy, my 2nd was perfect all 9months untill it was time to have him, which ended up in an emergancy section with major complications, each time i had the anti-d now only 4months after my 2nd child ive just found out im 6 weeks pregnant
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I'm also Rh neg. and my doctor advised me to get the shot after each miscarriage and/or during each preg. otherwise you will build up antibodies that could complicate the preg. I have had two miscarriages the last one being last week. We are hoping to start trying again soon.
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I am also rh negative, but I have three children who are grown and one has a baby. I had few complication. God has been good to me and has bless my children with good health!! I had to get the shots twice for every pregnancy.
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I am Rh Negative. I have have four misscarriages as a result, I am currently pregnant again. Every other time I had misscarried before or during my 13th week. I am not 14 weeks and I did not recieve my needle (Winroe). I have had no complications, such as hemmeraging, cramping or any other signs of a terminated pregnancy (misscarriage). So my advice to everyone is that if it is your time, it is your time. Other than that, check with your doctor regulary and get your blood work done asap when you find out you are in fact carrying. Good luck to everyone and keep trying, your time will come.
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hey, My sister is rh- and had a healthy baby boy 5 years ago. She is now pregnant again with a girl and is due at the end of next month. When she first found out she was pregnant this time she was in alot of pain. She went to the doctor and they told her that she was having an eptopic pregnancy and cut out her tube and sent it off to be tested. while waiting they gave her the rh- shot that you are supposed to get after giving birth to a baby. but come to find out.. when the results came back from the lab there wasnt a baby in the tube so she was still pregnant. Today she just found out that there is fluid build up around the baby's heart and in the baby's stomach. I was just wondering if the shot that she was given could of had any effect on the baby? Ive read some articles on hydros fitalis which causes fluid build up and is related to rh-. If anyone knows any information on that, it would be greatly appreciated. thanks -Amanda
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I too am Rh- (O-); the anti-D injection is called Rhophylac. This injection contains a medicine called human anti-D immunoglobulin. It is given to pregnant women who have a blood type known as rhesus negative. People whose blood type is rhesus positive (RhD positive) have a substance called D antigen on the surface of their red blood cells. People whose blood type is rhesus negative (RhD negative) are missing this antigen. Whether a person is rhesus positive or rhesus negative is determined by their genes. Having a rhesus negative blood type is not usually a problem. However, if a rhesus negative woman is pregnant and her baby is rhesus positive it may cause problems.If blood cells from a rhesus positive baby get into the rhesus negative mother's bloodstream, her blood will react as if the baby’s blood is a foreign substance and will produce antibodies against it. This is not usually a problem in a first pregnancy with a rhesus positive baby. However, the antibodies that the mother produces stay in her blood, and if she has another pregnancy with a baby who is also rhesus positive, her antibodies can cross the placenta and attack the blood cells of the unborn baby. This can cause 'haemolytic disease of the newborn'. Haemolytic disease of the newborn can be very mild, but in a small number of babies it can be more serious and cause the baby to be stillborn, severely disabled or to die after birth as a result of anaemia and jaundice.The most common time for a baby's blood cells to get into the mother's blood, causing her to produce antibodies, is at the time of birth. However, this can also occur at other times, for example during a miscarriage or abortion, or as the result of having an amniocentesis, chorionic villus sampling, vaginal bleeding, or turning the baby’s head down (external cephalic version). These events are called 'potentially sensitising events'. To prevent rhesus negative women producing antibodies against their baby’s blood during pregnancy they can be given an injection with anti-D immunoglobulin. This treatment is called anti-D prophylaxis, and prevents the mother's immune reaction that could cause haemolytic disease of the newborn.Anti-D prophylaxis is offered routinely to pregnant women who are rhesus negative, usually at weeks 28 and 34 of their pregnancy, unless they already have anti-D antibodies in their blood. (This is tested by a blood test at the start of the pregnancy.) The treatment is offered regardless of whether a sensitisation event has occurred, in order to be absolutely certain that the mother does not develop antibodies against the baby. After the birth, a blood sample will be taken to test the baby's blood group. If the baby is rhesus positive, the mother will be given a further injection of anti-D immunoglobulin. (This is called postnatal anti-D prophylaxis.) Anti-D immunoglobulin will also given after any sensitising event that occurs during the pregnancy. Anti-D prophylaxis may not be necessary for rhesus negative mothers if there is certainty that she will not have another child following the pregnancy, for example if she is to be sterilised after the birth. It will also not be necessary if the father's blood type is also rhesus negative, as genetically this means the baby cannot be rhesus positive. Anti-D immunoglobulin may also be used if a rhesus negative individual is given a blood transfusion of rhesus positive blood, to prevent the individual forming antibodies against the transfused blood.

When I was in the 28th week of my pregnancy (in 1996) I was given the RhoGam injection. RhoGAM is a medical treatment that has nearly eliminated the risk of jaundice, hypotonia, and motormental retardation from Rh incompatibility between a mother and fetus. Rh incompatibility occurs when a woman without the Rh factor (a protein found on the red blood cells of most people), conceives a child who has the Rh factor. The mother's Rh negative blood will react against the Rh positive blood of her fetus and attack it with antibodies.

The RhoGAM injection halts the mother's immune system from responding to the Rh positive blood of her child as a foreign threat and attacking it with antibodies. RhoGAM is a preventive drug and in its current form offers huge benefits with very minor side effects.
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I am also Rh Neg. 18 years ago I got pregnant my doctor at that time gave me a Rhogam shot immediately after learning my blood type. That pregnancy was successful and I have a beautiful 18 year old daughter. I had no complications. 18 years later my husband and I are trying to have a child. I have had two misscarraiges the first one was last March 2009, and the second one was yesterday Jan. 2010. I begged my doctor to give me the Rhogam shot at the beggining of the pregnancy for fear I would miscarry, however, he told me the shot is usually given at 28 weeks. I really feel my body has developed antibodies against anything foreign in my body. Is it possible to get any other type of treatment or shots or pills anything that will help my pregnancy be successful. Why can't I get the shot right when I get pregnant instead of 28 weeks? I really believe the reason I'm miscarrying is because my body is attacking the fetus. Please advise I want another baby with my husband.
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hello. i to am rh negative i had a miscariage about a yr ago and im know 6 weeks pregnate im extremly frightned i was wondering if anybody knows of other precautions other than wait untill 28 wks to get the shot? also i have read that theres higher risk when your spouse is positive and my husband is a negative does anybody know if that makes any differance please someone give me advice im very scared :-(
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I am rh negative and I miscarried at 19 weeks, almost 20 weeks. After having to give birth I recieved my first shot. About a year later I was pregnant again and there were no complications at all. I had a happy healthy girl. Three years later I had my son, and again no complications. After each pregnancy I did recieve a shot.
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