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I am having sharp shhoting pain under my right testicul. It feels like the pain i had when i had my vasectomy years ago.

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Post-vasectomy pain syndrome is a chronic and sometimes debilitating genital pain condition that may develop immediately or several years after vasectomy. Because this condition is a syndrome, there is no single treatment method, therefore efforts focus on mitigating/relieving the individual patient's specific pain.

 There is a noticeable increase in pressure within the vas deferens on the testicular side following vasectomy. The epididymides of vasectomized men are often swollen and distended from back pressure effects. The efferent ducts and seminiferous tubules of the testes are also impacted by back pressure, leading to an increase in area and thickness. Back pressure from blockage of the vas deferens causes a rupture in the epididymis, called an "epididymal blowout", in over half of vasectomy patients. Sperm sometimes leak from the vas deferens of vasectomized men, forming lesions in the scrotum known as sperm granulomas. Some sperm granulomas can be painful.

 As part of the reaction of the body to the surgical wounds of vasectomy, the body produces hard scar-like tissue. Clamping the vas deferens can produce muscle disruption and fibrosis. Cysts often form from the fluid that spreads between the muscle layers.

 Nerves can become trapped in the fibrous tissue caused by vasectomy. This pain is often heightened during sexual intercourse and ejaculation because, with arousal and ejaculation, muscles elevate the testis.

 As previously mentioned, treatment depends on the cause.

 A phone and postal survey of 172 patients 4 years after vasectomy found that 15% of respondents experienced chronic testicular discomfort that was troublesome and that 33% of respondents experienced some chronic testicular discomfort.

 A retrospective postal survey of 396 men found that 4% had significant genital pain for more than one year that required surgical intervention.

 Another study contacted 470 vasectomy patients and received 182 responses, finding that 18.7% of respondents experienced chronic genital pain with 2.2% of respondents experiencing pain that adversely affected quality of life.

None of this sounds good, does it.

 

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