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I have hypothyroidism. Among other things, it is really affecting my skin. Frankly, when I look in the mirror, I see skin that looks pale and dry - in a word, unhealthy. My skin feels cold to the touch as well, something my husband often comments on. My nails and hair are a mess too. I know these things are related to hypothyroidism, but they don't seem to want to budge. I'd love to give my skin some lovin', but have no idea where to even start. 

Are there any other people with hypothyroidism here, and how do you take are of your skin?

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Hypothryroid and skincare is tricky, yeah, I get that. You need to focus on the basics above all else. For great skin, you need hydrated skin, yeah? So look for stuff that infuses your skin with moisture like hyaluronic acid, and make sure to drink more than plenty of water a day. Make sure to use a pH balanced cleanser diligently, so yeah, no sleeping with makeup on. This alone will improve the overall look of your skin. For pigment issues you'll need to look into laser treatments if you wanna get rid of that, but it's tricky to treat. Consider investing in some pro makeup as well. 

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Look into alpha hydroxy acid as well as retinol! There are various options available, and among those you will want to investigate and discuss with your treating physician before you use them (always necessary when you have medical conditions) are Hydroquinone, Azelaic, and Kojic Acid. If those topical treatments are not successful for you, something as simple as a salicylic acid peel (or a series) can work, but some will need laser treatment to eliminate their hyperpigmentation, ultimately.
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See a dermatologist, and make sure that they coordinate with whoever you are seeing for your hypothyroidism - an endocrinologist? The skin pigmentation that people with hypothyroidism often suffer from is very much hormone related for certain, but nobody knows the exact mechanism that causes it, making treatment harder. 

Something I do know is that using sunscreen very, very consistently is a must for you, as is staying out of the sun as much as you can, especially during the hottest hours of the day. Some people do well with Triluma cream. However, you also should not discount the possibility that your particular pigmentation is unrelated to your thyroid condition. Hence the suggestion to approach diagnosis in a multi-faceted manner.  

 

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I'm sorry! My sister developed melasma after pregnancy, which I realize is not exactly the same thing that you have with the hypothryroid, but long story short, although the OBGYN said it would probably go away on its own, it didn't. Eight years on, it has only gotten worse. This is extremely frustrating, but topical creams have not helped her. She is now thinking about laser treatment as well. That is not always successful but is worth a try. With makeup, she can hide it quite well though.
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I have hypothryoid too and have started noticing some odd changes in my skin. Though it is good to read that I am not the only one (because pigment changes were actually never mentioned by my doc), this thread is not giving me much hope that I will be able to do something about this without surgical grade interventions. It is depressing, to be honest. It makes me feel really bad. I don't have a lot of money so laser and the like are outside my possibilities. No simple home remedies then? I will be stuck with this for life?
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This sounds familiar to me. My darker areas are around my upper lip and it took me a while to realize that they were there to stay and not, I don't know, the result of waxing or a tan or makeup or what not. They have become more noticeable over time, and I had no idea what was going on. Well, fast forward and I'm now going through tests to figure out what is up with my thyroid for other reasons, and it turns out the two could be related. Mmm... I'm now wondering what I can do about the darker spots because they are not particularly charming,
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In general, with skin pigmentation, you want to be looking at laser treatments rather than chemical peels for best results now. These target your hyperpigmentation while not harming your skin in any way. Unlike with creams and things like that, the results you are likely to see are permanent in that the pigment doesn't come back when you stop using the cream, and you have the added benefit of being able to discuss your skin condition with a dermatologist rather than taking things into your own hands by buying products you do not know are even safe with your hypothyroid.
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Lasers work best for light-skinned complexions. If you are olive or dark-skinned, avoid lasers as the heat can make the hyperpigmentation worse. My dermatologist recommends peels. It takes a long time, but slow and steady wins the race when it comes to melasma.
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I completely understand what your going through...i have this dark thicker part on the back of my neck which is gross and under my arms and between my legs..its embarrasing and i don't have money for laser treatments that ultimately may not even work...this sucks that we just have to live with it
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