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Hey everyone. My older neighbor Alexandra is one wonderful lady. I love to drink coffee with her in her garden and listen to the her stories, stories when she was young. But lately I have noticed that she is not going out of her house so I decided to visit her. I saw that she is not looking like she was looking before. I asked her what is going on and she told me that lately she is not feeling OK, maybe because of the bad weather and that she will need to do some ejection fraction measure. What is that? What does ejection fraction measure and how?

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Hey Make Me Coffee,

The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping out blood and in diagnosing and tracking heart failure. A significant proportion of patients with heart failure happen to have a normal ventricular ejection fraction atechocardiography during examination. Previously called diastolic heart failure, it is now referred to as heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) or HF with preserved ejection fraction.

  1. Preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) – also referred to as diastolic heart failure. The heart muscle contracts normally but the ventricles do not relax as they should during ventricular filling (or when the ventricles relax).
  2. Reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) – also referred to as systolic heart failure. The heart muscle does not contract effectively and less oxygen-rich blood is pumped out to the body.
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Hi guys,

Ejection fraction is a measurement of how much blood the left ventricle pumps out with each contraction. An ejection fraction of 60 percent means that 60 percent of the total amount of blood in the left ventricle is pushed out with each heartbeat. A normal heart's ejection fraction may be between 50 and 70.

You can have a normal ejection fraction reading and still have heart failure. If the heart muscle has become so thick and stiff that the ventricle holds a smaller-than-usual volume of blood, it might still seem to pump out a normal percentage of the blood that enters it. In reality, though, the total amount of blood pumped isn't enough to meet your body's needs.
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Hey MakeMeCoffee,

You probably heard about echocardiogram test, right? It's that one test which can find out if you have any sort of heart diseases or heart conditions. Well, echocardiogram is just one of the tests that are measuring ejection fraction, and the others are called MUGA scan, CAT scan, cardiac catheterization and nuclear stress test, but the echocardiogram test is the one mostly used. 

I'm honestly hoping that your neighbor is going to be okay, but usually people who are suggested to have their ejection fraction measured are the ones that really have problems with their hearts, but I'm holding my fingers crossed for her.

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Hi everyone,

Bee has a point there, usually the people who are told to do echocardiogram test (I'm saying echocardiogram test because it is the one most often used) are the ones that really have troubles with their hearts. You also said that your neighbor is an older lady, age is a risk factor of almost all heart diseases and conditions. She might have heart failure or cardiomyopathy.

You need to understand that older people are more prone to having problems with their hearts, you might see this for yourself one day. I can't give you a better advice rather than to just be there for her.

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Hello there.
Ejection fraction is really simple, painless test that is also called an echocardiogram. A special imaging machine uses sound waves to create a videotaped image of the heart, showing the four chambers of the heart, the valves and how well the heart is pumping. Very often there is possibility that the left ventricle, the heart’s main pumping chamber, is measured during an echocardiogram. A normal left ventricular ejection fraction is from 50 to 75 percent. Other tests used to measure EF include cardiac catheterization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and nuclear medicine scans.
I hope that you understand it. Good luck.
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Hello guys. Make me Coffee, it is very important to understand ejection fraction measure and what this is good for. People already explained to you how this measurement is done, but I will tell you that EF is used by physicians who wants to determine how good your heart is functioning. So if they told you that you need to do it, there is obviously some good reason for it. Also, an EF is a percentage of blood that is pumped out of the heart during each beat and term ejection refers to the amount of the blood that is pumped out of the heart’s main pumping chamber. It pumps it to the left ventricle during every heartbeat.

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Good day folks. Your heart pumps with each beat of your heart.  As you already know, your heart has left and right ventricular and both of them can be measured. For example - Left ventricular ejection fraction is the measurement of how much blood is being pumped out of the left ventricle of the heart (the main pumping chamber) with each contraction. On the other hand right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) is the measurement of how much blood is being pumped out of the right side of the heart to the lungs for oxygen. In most cases, the term “ejection fraction” refers to left ventricular ejection fraction.

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I had experience with it. Ejection fraction is a measurement of the percentage of blood leaving your heart each time it contracts. It is helpful procedure and helpful measurement and everyone who had some heart issue should do it. It works very simple - during each heartbeat pumping cycle, the heart contracts and relaxes. When your heart contracts, it ejects blood from the two pumping chambers – left and right one. When your heart relaxes, the ventricles refill with blood. It is good to know that the term "ejection fraction" refers to the percentage of blood that's pumped out of a filled ventricle with each heartbeat.

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Health Ace
6880 posts
" usually the people who are told to do echocardiogram test (I'm saying echocardiogram test because it is the one most often used) are the ones that really have troubles with their hearts."

Gee I hope not. My cardiologist, who just had me get one, recently told me the results of the previous stress tests showed my heart has no damage, is pumping fine, is regular and my arteries are fine. That was right after he told me I should be dead by now after I told him it has been 20 years since my 6x bypass surgery. He was referring to the fact that most people who had the surgery I did don't live 20 more years. I won't see him again for 3 weeks to find out the results of the echocardiogram, so we'll see.
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User avatar
Health Ace
6880 posts
My cardiologist's office just called. They have the results of the echocardiogram. It was "remarkably normal". The ejection fraction is fine, everything's pumping OK, the valves are working fine and the arteries are fine. Things are flowing great.
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I don't know, I mean, there is usually a very good reason if your doctor is telling you to do an echocardiogram test. What I meant was that it usually shows bad results for people who didn't have any surgeries before, meaning that the doctor noticed some symptoms which made him think that you should do the echocardiogram test.

I'm honestly glad to hear that you are doing well, njoynlife. You are a very strong person, at least I can conclude that from what you just wrote. I wish you many more decades to live without any more surgical procedures being needed.
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User avatar
Health Ace
6880 posts
I think the main reason was my primary care doctor discovered it has been 20 years since the bypass surgery and I've had no follow up checks since. She scheduled me to see a cardiologist just because of that and his office scheduled me for several stress tests. When I saw him after those tests he was surprised I was still alive 20 years after the surgery with no more problems. Since the stress tests all came in fine he had one last test up his sleeve I guess..
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Lighten up on the coffee and next time bring over a nice pot of herbal tea. Better yet take a long walk in a safe place with her. (Around the yard?) Stick to that routine and your pleasant neighbor will be around longer. btw I hope her tests come back ok or borderline where diet, exercise and less coffee can help.
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