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I am a 43 year old female who is considered healthy by my doctor.  I had my tonsils taken out 16 days ago.  I have had chronic problems with them for 15 years.  My tonsils, although small, were almost always swollen.  Initially, I was told by a general doctor that there was nothing wrong with me.  Months later, I was told by a different general doctor that I had a blocked salivary gland and was referred to an ENT.  I was told by that ENT that that diagnosis wasn't correct and that I had cryptic tonsils (that would retain fluids etc.) and tonsillitis.  She said that having a tonsillectomy would fix these problems.  The scariest risk is the small (I was told about 1%) risk that you will have extreme bleeding after the surgery and have to be rushed back to the hospital to fix this.  I started reading these posts that describe how horrible this surgery is, and how it's too painful to consider.  I went ahead and did it anyway, as I thought that I was confident that I would be able to survive the two weeks of pain.  I was right.

My overall experience was very good.  I never felt as if I had made the wrong decision.  The pain at peak times did feel very unpleasant, but I never felt as though I couldn't stand it.  The medication does a good job of dulling it down.  I took off two weeks from work and prepared for the pain.  You will need to have someone stay with you to help you.  I had my mother and her adorable dog.  Here are a few tips:

1.  Have access to a large amount of ice.  Putting an ice bag on your throat helps the pain.  I also chose to use a heating pad to put on me elsewhere, as it felt good.

2.  Get liquid food so that you are able to "eat" something.  I had plenty of Special K shakes, apple sauce, pudding, sorbet, and chicken noodle soup.  For some reason bread seemed to be very difficult to swallow, so I avoided it.  Foods like Spaghettios, which I would have thought would be easy to eat and were, but the sauce really burned, so I stopped eating it.

3.  Be careful with your medication.  Ask your doctor for a list of side effects so your prepared.  I took Roxicet; I took an amount that was just under the prescribed dosage and I still felt as though I had been swept away to another world it was so strong.  There is a warning on it to be careful with machinery.  I think it should say do not go near machinery.  Don't drive.

4.  Drink a lot of water on an ongoing basis.  Put a thermos filled with as much ice as it hold with water near your bed.  Set your alarm to wake you up every few hours so that you can get up and at least swallow a few sips.  This will make your throat feel better if you do this.  The less water you drink, the more your throat hurts, which then makes you want to drink even less.  It's a vicious cycle.

 

Right now, my mouth feels good.  It's not perfect, as my tongue has a few unfamiliar mild sensations, but nothing terrible.  A few foods taste a bit different.  I am not worried about it as I really have only had the surgery just a few weeks ago and was told eventually, with the exception of rare cases, this will go away over time.  My throat is only just the tiniest bit sore at this point.  My doctor who did the surgery (I ended up getting a second opinion from another ENT and went with the second doctor is great, but has a terrible bedside manner) did say not to look into your mouth right after the surgery, as you will drive yourself crazy.  He also said not to read all of the "posts on the internet".  I have to say that he was right on both; you will scare yourself out of doing this surgery if you do really need it and you will end of "diagnosing" your throat with all sorts of problems that you may not have as, as he pointed out "I'm not a doctor and don't know what I am looking at".  Of course I didn't listen to him.

Rather than detail every minute thing each day after the surgery, email me on this forum with any questions.

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Thank you for this. I am on day 6 of recovery and it has not been fun. I guess all of the pain and side affects I expected. I just didn't expect them to be this tough if that makes any sense. I have been battling a severe case of tonsilitis and acid reflux that affects the throat since July. So I was more than ready to have my whole throat removed. I did not realize that my acid reflux would continue after my tonsils were removed but the antibiotics prescribed definitely have my acid reflux peaking at te wrong time. A combination of tonsils removed and acid buildup in your throat is a horrible combination. I am thankful to hear these stories because it feels as though recovery is taking forever. So to know someone has recovered gives me some kind of optimism. I hope the pain and nausea from the meds go away soon. Im ready to eat and be normal again. Oh I also forgot to mention I have to see a pulmonolgist due to a nodule being found on my lung during a catscan. So my nerves are all over the plalce.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Davella, day 6 was painful. At about day 10-11, things started to get better. I did have nausea too, especially when I woke up for a few hours each day. Remind yourself that the way you feel now is temporary. That's what would make me just a little happier. For the nausea, I know it's counterintuitive, but eat a bite of something really bland that you can swallow if you think you can without throwing it up (maybe a few tiny pieces of the inside of a very soft bread, like Wonder bread and swallow it slowly.) I did this for medium level nausea. I have read that this often works and to my surprise it did with me. When I woke up from surgery, I threw up I was so nauseas. Not fun at all! Think non-nauseas thoughts. Let me know if it helps. Lying on my back with the ice on my face and throat helped a bit too, along with breathing evenly.
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Oh, and I meant to say, good luck with your lung.
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