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I had such a crappy run tonight, this after a near effortless run on the same trail on Sunday that left me really recharged about starting up again. Granted, Sunday was like 60's, low humidity and no sun, and today was hot and sticky and gross, but does it honestly make THAT much of a difference in otherwise duplicate conditions? It was really disheartening--I know I'm just starting back (again) but man, that really sucked. I usually love running no matter what but the only thing good about this one was that it ended. :(

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Yep. Summers are rough... the best times to run are early morning, and here it's still 70+ degrees and 100% humidity. Just stick it out I guess... or run indoors?
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That's why I run and bike in the mornings now. Kinda cool to get both done before 7am.
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Humidity sucks. I ran in some today. Normally it makes me feel sluggish and weighed down. I sweat a bit more, too.

To avoid the humidity I try to avoid running right before or after a rain. Such a situation was my only chance to run today. In the summer I normally run between the time I wake up to around 11am or noon. After those times, it's either too hot or raining to run.

Running indoors is very boring and drab. Plus, the only places to run indoors where I reside usually feel almost as hot and humid indoors as they do outdoors.
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Must be that kind of day. I had a tempo run tonight with my training group and thought I was going to pass out. It was deceptively cool (70), and raining. I checked the weather channel and humidity close to 100%. It really bit.
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You know, exercise physiology is SO COOL. I've been doing a little research as to why specifically the humidity factor is so significant. For me, it is more of a respiratory issue, not being able to catch my breath, than anything else and what I read makes sense as to why, in sort of a back door manner. Part of this was obvious but when you connect the dots it explains a lot:

Increased humidity decreases the evaporation rate of sweat, which is essential to help cool the body in warmer conditions. Obviously, the atmosphere is already saturated with moisture, to put it simply, and cannot absorb any more. This means that the body has to resort to increased blood flow to the skin, which is another compensatory measure that facilitates heat removal. This process requires an increase in heart rate and output of blood when your heart is already being taxed from the exertion of running. Since you only have so much cardiac output, this results in a lower steady speed and earlier exhaustion than in cooler conditions. Conversely to what I had thought, the oxygen demand doesn't necessarily increase in the heat, but since the thermal stress load (greater need for a cooling mechanism) does, having to send more blood to the skin surface will obviously detract from the volume of blood sent to your muscles, which will decrease their oxygen supply. Following that thought, your respiratory system is also working harder to try and bring in more oxygen to your deprived muscles, which is why breathing is more difficult and often, as in my case, a real struggle.

I love this stuff!!! :fubby:
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I'm not right apparently.... some of my best runs come in high humidity conditions. I have no idea why. I'll lose anywhere from 2-4 lbs in water loss and feel like a million bucks afterwards. Of course I spend a good part of the day traipsing back and forth to the drinking fountain...
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I'm not wild about it, but I'll run when it's hot and humid. That way, if race day shapes up the same, weather-wise, I have some idea what it's like and how to deal with it.

It worked with all the running in the rain before Mad City. I figure it couldn't hurt for this.
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Yeah its rough at the beginning of the summer, gradually gets easier as you do it more and training in it pays in dividends once things cool off a bit in the fall.

There is NO evaporation of your sweat when the air is saturated (which would be why it looks like I just jumped in a pool and rolled in salt after a lot of runs :umno: ) so your body is basically overheating. Its not the sweating but the evaporation of said sweat that cools the body from what I understand.

I've heard humidity is lowest at night, highest in the morning? (not sure if thats accurate). So if you live where it actually cools off at night maybe that would help? :shrug:
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So far the weather down here's ok although it got over 70 a few times but it wasn't too humid-just dry heat. I still do most of my training runs at noon/lunch time since that's the best time for me to train (I have to commute to and from work). Fortunately it doesn't get too hot/humid at where I work (with a few exceptional days) since it's near the coast and there's always nice breeze to cool it down abit. However I moved my Saturday long runs to the early mornings (around 6:30-7 am) since I do them near where I live. My home is quite far inland and gets alot hotter during the summer than on the coast (temperature difference is about 5-6 degrees celsius)
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whose runs really SUCK in the heat & humidity..... I had such a crappy run tonight, this after a near effortless run on the same trail on Sunday that left me really recharged about starting up again. Granted, Sunday was like 60's, low humidity and no sun, and today was hot and sticky and gross, but does it honestly make THAT much of a difference in otherwise duplicate conditions? It was really disheartening--I know I'm just starting back (again) but man, that really sucked. I usually love running no matter what but the only thing good about this one was that it ended. :(

All you have to do is compare my race and run times from the winter and compare them to the summer to see how much the heat and humidity affect me down here. Separate rant along this line is coming. I need to finish it in word first and spell check it.

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It's hard to breath in this humidity and then with the bonus of feeling like, no actually being as if, you are running after jumping into a hot pool...all sticky and wet....it isn't the most pleasent experience.
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I think it is pretty common for some runners to experience negative effects from training in the heat and humidity.
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Does that make them commoners?
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It must be even worse in higher altitudes, no?? Or do you not notice it so much? Or is it drier out there where you are?
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