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I ran with a running group last week for the first time. I enjoyed the run, maybe bacuase the groups pace was a little slower than what I am used to or maybe because it was fun having others to talk with.

However, on a 10 mile run, the group took 3 walking breaks of about 1 minute each. I don't usually walk when I do my long runs by myself. So, will my endurance be hurt by taking the walking breaks with the group?

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It's probably not helping your endurance any, especially if you can do 10 miles w/o walking at all, but I'm willing to bet that running with a group that can make running more interesting/entertaining will do more to help you stick with running. Running is frequently a lonely man's sport and having some company on runs sometimes will help take the edge off the boredom.
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Thanks PH.

It is was more fun running with the group. I may try mixing in some long runs by myself and without walking to offset the group runs with walking. The other idea was to do like last week and take the walking breaks with the group for the 1st half of the run and then do the last half of the run without the group and skip the walking breaks.
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The question I have is: how detrimental are these walking breaks to you and if you feel that they are, run a couple more miles before hand or after to compensate? I'd love the opportunity to run in a group and would take full advantage of that, Packer backer.
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How does this sound as a compromise? Run 4 miles to meet up with the group, run 10 miles with the group and take their breaks, then run 4 miles back to the house.
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running an extra 8 miles to compensate for three one-minute walk breaks?

Seems a bit extreme to me, PB.
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I think if I really tried, I could make this more confusing.

I ran 18 last weekend and plan on 18 again this week. The group stopped at 10 last week, so I ran an extra 8 without the group last week and lacked th company.

This week I was thinking about breaking up the 8 miles into 4 before and 4 after with the 10 group miles (with breaks) in the middle.

Confusing enough?

And to think that I started running because of the simplicity!
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I think if I really tried, I could make this more confusing. And to think that I started running because of the simplicity! Well if you want confusing advice, you're talking to the right person! Here's what I suggest: 1. an easy 4 miler alone (might I suggest 64 X 100s?) 2. Ten miler with group (every other mile run backwards and sing various sitcom jingles). 3. Find yourself a nice swamp and finish up doing 4 miles with the water at 'neck' level. Can't wait to hear how it goes!! joel, trainer 4 life
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Is it feasible to run the other direction when they take their walk breaks and then catch up with them when they start running again? That way you don't have to stop running and you've still got company.

I do like your idea of 4 pre-run miles and 4 post-run miles. I do that when I'm riding with someone and they live within riding distance just to get in a few extra miles on the bike.
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I like the idea of running the other direction during the walking breaks and then catching up. I will give that a try tomorrow and see what happens.

Shelf, not too sure about the swamp idea, but it would certainly add to the confusion.
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Hey PB1 If you were to ask this question on some other running forums, you would have been flamed, blasted and pretty much told you were a fool. Some runners have a very negative opinion of those walking breaks. As you probably know, they're pushed by Jeff Galloway as part of his training program for marathons. I'm a little confused about two things though. 1)Did Mr. Galloway actually train with walking breaks when he made the Olympic team? and 2)Can walking actually improve your time? The whole idea behind the long run is to run long and get your body used to that. But I digress... I would agree with PH, by continuing to run while they walk.
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I'm a little confused about two things though. 1)Did Mr. Galloway actually train with walking breaks when he made the Olympic team? and 2)Can walking actually improve your time?


Nope. Galloway was a maniac when he was an Olympic runner, logging tons of miles and not a walk among them. The elitist die-hards you speak of on other forums say he sold out for the buck when he tried to reach out to Joe Coach Potato by putting the walk breaks into his training program. As a newbie runner, I used them but was pretty much shamed out of it by the more experienced runners at Kick. I did learn to run without needing them and don't use them today. I can say, though, that (again, as a BEGINNER) I was able to push a little harder/further knowing that just over that next hill, I got to walk and catch my breath, but as I became a stronger runner, I felt like the walks slowed me down because I had a harder time getting going again so that's also why I stopped using them. MHO is if someone "needs" to walk, they are not going at a comfortably steady pace for them and should slow down slightly but keep running. I always had a tendency to go out faster than I should have and needed them because I burnt out too quickly instead of building up with negative splits after starting steady. Especially on the long runs, consistent pace is important.
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I only use them during the actual marathon race. Not smaller races, not training runs. My goal for my next marathon is to not use them at all.
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There's two issues here that we should separate. First, with a group run, you are in all likelihood running somewhat faster or slower than you would otherwise on your own. In either case, you're not hitting the exact workout your schedule might call for. If the group pushes you faster, and you take 3 measly minutes of walking breaks, I'd call it a wash. If you're running slower than usual and there's some walking breaks, then you've dogged the run on two counts.

My spin with dogging a run is there's absolutely nothing wrong with it ...just don't do it often and don't count it as a "quality" run. So if you're schedule calls for a long run of 10 miles and you end up dogging it with a slow pace and walking breaks (I'd hardly worry about 3 minutes worth though), my own tendency would be to get on the road again a few days later and log a quality 10 miler. That's just me though.

As for the elitests that blast walking breaks, let's call 'em what they really are, simply breaks. And unless you live in some runner's utopia, your run is going to be interrupted by having to wait for a green light, crossing traffic, trains, water stop, brief chat with a neighbor, step around a gate to a trailhead, tie you shoe ..whatever comes up in just about everybody's average run, there's a time 'you're not running'. Whether it be an actual planned walk period or something I mentioned above, it's impossible to be running at a pace the absolute entire time. Few people actually call it Gallowalking, but everybody has a few minutes, especially on long runs, where they're running less than their pace.

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