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How slow do you usually go for your long run? Is there a too slow?

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The long ones I run are supposed to be a couple minutes slower in pace than my the rest of my training runs*. It no doubt varies from program to program.

* weekday (regular) runs 8:25/mile, long runs from 8:45 to 10:05.
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I go for right at 70% of my Max HR (which is 155). Yesterday I ran for 2 hrs. and my Avg. HR was 156 BPM. I'm getting to be a big believer in HRM training, especially on the long runs.
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I don't have the patience to run my LSD runs slow enough. I tend to run them at the same pace as my easy/recovery runs. I think this is probably 45seconds to a minute faster than I should run the LSD runs, but I am usually in a hurry on the weekends and 15 minutes makes a big difference.

I usually take the day after the lsd run as an off day, so that may be why my faster LSD pace does not hurt my other runs.
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My interpretation of long slow distance, is just that - Long SLOW Distance.
Very easy running, about the pace of my neigbhours 11 year old Labrador dog.
Say your working towards a marathon and you estimate it will take you say 3 to 4 hours. You should be working gradually to build up your running to the same amount of time. The distance covered doesn't matter.
The time on your feet is what matters.
I'm sure the calculator has its benefits but I like to keep it simple.
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Ill keep it around 70-75% max HR (according to Karnoven calculation based on resting HR) which is around 138-154 for me. Preferably Ill keep in somewhere in the mid to upper 140s with the upper limit towards the end of the run.
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The calculator does an okay job, but it is a bit conservative on the easy and long run paces, especially for less advanced runners. Many people don't feel comfortable going as slow as the calculator says to go. This version of my calculator is roughly based on Dr. Jack Daniels. I have another one in the works using my own research that I think handles the easy and long run paces a little better for most people.

It is possible to go too slow. Time on your feet is the most important thing for a marathon training long run, but at some point it can become slow enough that you no longer use a normal running motion. This can leave you a lot more beat up and more fatigued than actually running faster. If your training distance in a long run requires a pace so slow that it feels awkward, then pick up the pace a bit and take walking breaks as needed.
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Craig, I totally agree that you can run too slow but I hold strong that you should really rein back on your long runs. (marathon runners)
Form is all important, even if you're only running slowly. If a runner is not using a normal running motion it goes without saying he/she has to to increase their pace until they are running efficiently. But running with EASE.
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This really doesn't go without saying. It is amazing how many people don't understand this. Of course, like everything with running, it varies from person to person. Some people, like myself, have a very specific pace where their form changes. Literally, a 10 second per mile difference causes me to shift from a shuffle to a normal run. The better shape I am in, the fast the pace where this occurs. If I run slower than this, I get tired and sore very quickly. Still people tell me I should be doing easy runs at 10:00 pace. Even if I could run that pace without destroying myself, I really wouldn't want to.
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Horses for courses Craig!
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