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  1. Steady pace the entire time
  2. Gradually increase the pace through the run
  3. jack rabbit the start and slow down towards the end
  4. no particular pattern
  5. something else

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Well, I generally start with a warm-up of a mile or two, and then a. steady pace followed by a cool down mile or so. I did a great amount of tempo runs for the Twin Cities Marathon. I got to the point where I was pretty good at them. However, I did find to do them consistently, I had to do them at the track. My mile markers around here are all a little bit off, just usually the total route is measured accurately. So running on the track certainly helped me track my splits, enabling me to run a good tempo run.
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  1. Steady pace the entire time
Shorter distance, 2-4 miles at an 85% MHR pace, which is in the mid 150 range.
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start of slower then pick it up. Really work any hills, ease on the downs, push the flats.
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On the treadmill I would start easy for 1/2 mile, then set the pace I want to run, then cool down.

That is the best because your pace is set mechanically not by me, which is easy to back off too. I make a conscious effort to to "down" the speed on the mill.
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If I'm on a treadmill I'll push to do negative splits. When not on a treadmill once I'm warmed up I'll do at least the first half of the run at a steady pace. Then I try to gauge what I've got left to see if I can pick it up for the rest of the run or just keep the pace.
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left, right, left, right.....lefetrightleftrightleftright...left, right, left right.....

Warm up mile, try to keep steady faster pace for 2-4, then cool down mile a little faster than the warmup mile but slower than the middle miles. Isn't the favored theory to run the middle miles at your anticipated race pace and do the before and afters slower?

On the dreadmill, I do what Rob does and set each mile at a little faster speed so I end up running negatives, and sprint all out at the last 1/4 mile. Then I trot for a mile as a freebie cool down.
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:shrug: I try to gradually speed up a little each mile and be at or below 5K race pace for a little bit at the end.
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How long are your tempo runs usually?
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They were 3-4 miles until I finally got to where I could beat my record for my 5.1 mile route and now they're all 5.1 miles.
BTW - I was able to run my 5.1 mile route yesterday at a faster pace than my 5K PR just three weeks ago! :banana:
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That rocks!!! Sounds like your way is working! Mega could speak to this better than I since he's more well versed in Pfitzinger theory than I am, but I just looked in Pfitzinger's Advanced Marathoning and this is what he says: "A typical training session to improve lactate threshold consists of a 15- to 20-minute warmup, followed by a 20- to 40-minute tempo run and a 15-minute cooldown." He goes on to say, and now this is for marathon training so I guess you would have to adjust your times accordingly if using for shorter distance training, that "slower runners should run closer to 15K race pace on tempo runs, and faster runners should run closer to half marathon race pace. LT threshold training should be run at close to the pace that you could currently race for 1 hour." I am not sure how you'd translate that into training for a half or even a 10K....Jerry, can you elaborate on what your interpretation would be of this???
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5 to 6 miles
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a tempo run is a tempo run is a tempo run...in other words, your lactate threshold doesn't change whether you're training for a marathon, half-mary or 5k...however, improving your threshold will benefit you more in racing longer distances, since your tempo pace should be pretty close to your 10 mile pace / half marathon pace...if you want PRs at long distances, get in plenty of tempo work...want faster 5k times? well, you better hit the track and bang out 220s and 440s...
all i know is for me during last summer's marathon training, I preferred running the 20 milers rather then the weekly 5-7 mile tempo runs...7 miles at tempo pace with 2 mile warm up and 2 mile cool down, in the middle of a 50 mile week, in 80 degree weather is a ball buster no matter how you look at it...
---
megawill
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For my last round of tempo runs it was approximately 6 miles at an easy pace and then the final 2 I tried to do at near race pace. Hopefully it will pay off at my race tomorrow!
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7 miles at tempo pace with 2 mile warm up and 2 mile cool down, in the middle of a 50 mile week, in 80 degree weather is a ball buster no matter how you look at it...

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