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Since starting back to running, I have just been trying to go a little farther every couple of runs. How do you establish a long run--like once a week? Do you just keep your other runs about the same, and build distance on that one day a week? Is there a certain weekly mileage I should be running before I think about starting a long run? What color are your eyes? Sorry--I couldn't stop asking questions.

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How do you establish a long run--like once a week?
I do one long run a week. Some weeks I'll throw in a longer than normal run, but I still wouldn't count that as a long run.
I don't have an answer for that one. Maybe 10 miles per week? :shrug:
What color are your eyes?
brown
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Thank you, Purple Hayes--that was helpful info.
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I vary speed and distance throughout the week. Typically goes like this:
Sunday: LSD (Long Slow Distance) - this would be my long run which I've been slowly increasing on a weekly basis
Monday: 3 mile recovery run
Tuesday: 7-8 miles at an easy pace
Wednesday: 3 miles hard
Thursday: 8 miles, not hard but I do push it
Friday: speedwork
Saturday: off

I would recommend starting to consider a once a week long run after you're up to about 15 miles a week. Just my two cents.
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I've found the "30% rule" to be a good benchmark. So when you take your weekly mileage goal, 30% of that should be your once a week long run. Then from there I split training into 2-20% days and 3-10% days, shuffling the easy days between the longer ones. It doesn't need to be rocket science. So as you increase your weekly mileage total, all the dailies increase proportionally.
And as for when to start a long run, I think it's important at any level. If you're only logging 12 mile weeks, a 3.6 mile run should feel like you're pushing the envelope. If you have no problem with that, I'd start at a bigger weekly mileage and figure the dailies from there.
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I've found the "30% rule" to be a good benchmark. So when you take your weekly mileage goal, 30% of that should be your once a week long run. Then from there I split training into 2-20% days and 3-10% days, shuffling the easy days between the longer ones. It doesn't need to be rocket science. So as you increase your weekly mileage total, all the dailies increase proportionally.
And as for when to start a long run, I think it's important at any level. If you're only logging 12 mile weeks, a 3.6 mile run should feel like you're pushing the envelope. If you have no problem with that, I'd start at a bigger weekly mileage and figure the dailies from there.
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Once again, I agree with jrjo...
I think you can probably go with a four miler for your long run, if you are doing a bunch of 2 mile runs.
If your normal run is 3 miles...bump that up to five...and then build steadily. Run the same distance for about 3 weeks...then add a mile to your long run...repeat.
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Thanks, everyone. I appreciate all the help I'm getting here.
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Here is something I got from a RW article some years ago which I still use today. I think Joe Henderson came up with it...

Run Scheduler:

1. Decide the total number of miles you plan to run during the week. ___
2. Enter the number of days you plan to run during the week. ___
3. Figure the daily average needed to reach your your quota. (divide figure 1 by figure 2. ___
4. The projected length of the "short runs". (divide figure 3 by half) ___
5. How long your long run should be. (Multiply figure 3 by two) ___
6. Weekly schedule (include a long run, at least two short runs, then schedule the others near the average):
Day one ___
Day Two ___
Day Three ____
Day Four ___
Day Five ___
Day Six ___
Day Seven ___
8. Increase your total mileage at a rate of 10% per week and recalulate.
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depending on what your total mileage is right now.....you might want to go my time rather than distance. Then you're not pushing yourself to get that extra 1/2 mile or 1 mile in on your long day....you're just hanging out for a few more minutes. I think this prevents you from pushing yourself too hard in the beginning and it's getting your body used to being out there longer without necessarily picking up the pace.

sue
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