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I've been running, off and on, for 25 years but I'm having a tough time building mileage on this start up. I trained for and ran a half marathon last spring in 1:57 on 25 miles a week. After that I took some time off but maintained a base of 10 miles a week or so. Now I can't seem to get past 3 miles at 8:45 pace or so without feeling wasted. I have to stop sometimes. My diet and weight have not changed. Any ideas?

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how does three miles feel at a slower pace?

welcome :wavey:
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Are you doing weekend long runs at a slower pace?
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Is the 10-mi weeks all that you're doing right now? One thing I do myself is mix in cycling and rowing to keep the cardio-vascular up and even though my running mileage might dip and rise at times, I can keep my endurance fitness decent enough to take the bumps in running miles.
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The 10 mile weeks (every other day) are all I can seem to handle (at aprox. 9:00 pace. I haven't tried a slower pace (it seems like walking) and when I try a longer run, I still quit at 3-4 miles. I can run 1 mile in 6:00 or so, so I have some speed left.

I'm 50 and have been running for 25 years (on again off again with a 2:49 marathon best). I ran a 1:57 half-marathon last April and was able to build miles then.
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I am a total newbie at all this but I find that if I run in a loop it's harder than running one way and then back again. It's a psych game to me I am sure but I really feel like the longer distances are easier for me. What happens if you start out by running two miles in one direction and than you have to go two more miles to make it back? Does that make sense? Then just increase as you feel better.
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Ah, this reminds me of a phenomenon I experienced with my car. I used to park at the park (har-har) near the lake then run a loop around the lake. If I was trying to add extra mileage after the first loop, it was always very difficult beyond the point where my car was. I think subconsciously, I told myself, "there's the car, time to stop." I changed things up and found that my runs were much better if I added the mileage midway through the loop, even by doubling up part of the run, as long as it ended at my car. This still works for me, and on long runs I routinely throw myself as far away from my end point as possible so I have no choice but to run the mileage. This has gotten somewhat off topic, but I'll salvage it by saying that if you're stuck in a rut, try a new route.
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